Mallarmé: Pages and A Throw of the Dice

Poème: un coup de dés jamais n'abolira de hasard, par Stéphane Mallarmé, Ed́itions de la Nouvelle revue française, 1914, State Library of New South Wales RHQ/1003

Poème: un coup de dés jamais n'abolira de hasard, par Stéphane Mallarmé, Ed́itions de la Nouvelle revue française, 1914, State Library of New South Wales RHQ/1003   

Scholars regard Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-1898)́ as one of France's pre-eminent poets and I was excited to come across two of his rarest publications here in the State Library of New South Wales collections.   

One of these is the groundbreaking 1897 poem, Un coup de dés jamais n'abolira de hasard or A throw of the dice will never abolish chance. This ambitious work is full of esoteric symbolism and disjointed syntax written in free verse. It also disregards typographical conventions such as left alignment and uniform type. As you can see from the image the text cascades across the pages with some words and phrases emphasized through a larger font size while others switch between roman and italic type.
 
A version was published in 1897 in the literary review Cosmopolis but it was not until 1914, 16 years after his death,  that it was printed in a book form which reflected Mallarmé's exacting vision for the typographical layout and format of the poem. Before his death Mallarmé had worked on a deluxe edition, illustrated with lithographs by Odilon Redon, with the firm of Lahure. This deluxe edition was abandoned after his death. The proof sheets and prints were sold by the publisher.

Upon seeing proofs for the poem, the French poet, essayist, and philosopher, Paul Valery wrote,

It seemed to me that I was looking at the form and pattern of a thought, placed for the first time in finite space. Here space itself truly spoke, dreamed, and gave birth to temporal forms. Expectancy, doubt, consternation, all were visible things. . . . There amid murmurs, insinuations, visual thunder, a whole spiritual tempest carried page by page to the extremes of thought, to a point of ineffable rupture - there the marvel took place; there on the very paper some indescribable scintillation of final stars trembled infinitely pure in an inter-conscious void; and there on the same void with them, like some new form of matter arranged in systems or masses or trailing lines, coexisted the Word! I was struck dumb by this unprecedented arrangement. It was as if a new asterism had proffered itself in the heavens; as if a constellation had at last assumed a meaning. Was I not witnessing an event of universal importance, and was it not, in some measure, an ideal enactment of the Creation of Language that was being presented to me on this table at this last minute, by this individual, this rash explorer, this mild and simple man who was so unaffectedly noble and charming by nature?

mallarme_front matter une_coup_1914_and_papers

Front Matter: un coup de dés jamais n'abolira de hasard, par Stéphane Mallarmé, Ed́itions de la Nouvelle revue française, 1914, State Library of New South Wales RHQ/1003   

In 1911, Gaston Gallimard decided to publish 'A Throw of the Dice...'.   This text was prepared for publication by Mallarmé's son-in-law Edmond Bonniot, and includes some of the poet's last corrections and recommendations. 

The first edition of 1000 copies was printed at L'Imprimerie Sainte Catherine in Bruges on July 10, 1914. Of these, 10 copies were printed on Montval paper and a further 90 copies were printed on Vélin d'Arches paper; both were bound in Japanese parchment paper wrappers. 

The remaining 900 copies were printed and bound using ordinary paper.

Stephane Mallarme, Pages, frontispiece etching by Auguste Rnoir, 1891 State Library of New South Wales, TQ057331

Stephane Mallarme, Pages, frontispiece etching by Auguste Rnoir, 1891 State Library of New South Wales, TQ057331

There are two copies of this book in the library (RHQ/1003 and TQ056711). The copy pictured on the left was donated to the library as a part of the Randolph Hughes Collection of French and Pre-Raphaelite Literature. Loose inside the front cover, and alongside the Hughes' bookplate, is an interesting set of documents. These include an early twentieth-century vintage print of an unidentified man, a published exegesis on Mallarmé and a newspaper clipping of Mallarme's obituary written by Henri Mondor. 

The second rare publication is Pages, a collection of Mallarmé poems published in 1891.  The main feature in the printing of this book is the copper etching of a young woman in the frontispiece,  drawn by the impressionist, Auguste Renoir (1841-1919). Renoir was a great friend of Mallarmé who was a supporter of modern painting and published his thoughts on the subject in numerous articles. To thank Mallarmé  for this support, Manet and Renoir illustrated some of his poems and painted portraits of him. This publication had a very limited print run. The Library's copy is listed as being "No’ 73 of 275"

References:
Mallarmé, S. (1914). Poème : Un coup de dés jamais n'abolira de hasard. Paris: Ed́itions de la Nouvelle revue française.
Mallarmé, S. (1891).,Pages, Stéphane Mallarmé. Bruxelles: Edmond Deman
Mallarmé, S., & Weinfield, H. (1994). Collected poems / Stéphane Mallarmé ; translated, and with a commentary by Henry Weinfield. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Jeremy Glazier, Los Angeles Review of Books, Un Coup d’idées: A New Translation of Mallarmé’s “A Roll of the Dice.  

Author
Geoff Barker, Senior Curator, Research and Discovery, State Library of New South Wales, 2018

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