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New shoes

Students respond appropriately to discussion questions and compose texts supported by visual information (e.g. illustrations) on familiar topics.
Stimulus #1: 
Children’s shoe department Grace Brothers Department Store, photograph by Sam Hood ca 1930s
Stimulus #2: 
A pair of baby’s shoes (ca 1865-1885) Bingle family

Text Type

Informative:

  • Students engage in conversations and discussion about their favourite shoes, using active listening behaviours, showing interest, and contributing ideas, information and questions.
  • Students write a description about their favourite pair of shoes.

Background notes for teachers

The State Library of New South Wales collections include not only books but also realia.  Realia, such as these shoes belonging to Sarah Bingle, are often included in the personal papers and manuscripts bought or donated to libraries.

Student Activities

Discussion Questions

Students respond appropriately to discussion questions and compose texts supported by visual information (e.g. diagrams and maps) on familiar topics.

Number of set tasks: 1

Poetry Response

Students respond to poems and stories about shoes. They compose a list of shoes that would like to own.

Number of set tasks: 1

Activity notes for teachers

The pictured baby shoes belonged to a little girl named Sarah Bingle.  They are made of leather and have ribbon shoe laces as ties.  In the 1880’s very few children’s shoes were made specifically for left or right feet.  This type of shoe is called a straight shoe and can be worn on either foot!  These baby shoes are over a hundred years old and are part of the collection of the State Library of New South Wales

Prior to this activity, teachers ask students to bring in a photo of their favourite shoes or the shoes themselves to class.

Discuss the difference in shoes: size, colour, purpose

Suggested Discussion Questions

Did you have a favourite pair of shoes when you were younger? Why were they your favourite? Describe them.

Do you remember going to buy new shoes when you were younger?

  • When did you buy new shoes?  
  • What happens when you go to buy shoes?
  • Were there special reasons for buying new shoes?
  • What is the best part of buying new shoes?
  • What is the worst part of buying new shoes?

Students will be asked to write a description of their favourite pair of shoes. 

Stories about shoes

Ask students to bring in picture books about shoes from home for shared reading.
Ask students if they know any fairy tales that feature shoes or where shoes are important to the story.

Poems about shoes

Recite these traditional poems about shoes.
Look online for Frida Wolfe’s poem Choosing New Shoes.
The poem first describes the types of shoes the narrator wishes she could buy.
She describes the sort of shoes her parents will buy her.
In Student Activity 3, the students are asked to write two lists and compare them for similarities and differences.

Additional:  Nursery Rhymes featuring shoes

Cobbler, Cobbler, mend my shoe.

Cobbler, cobbler, mend my shoe.
Get it done by half past two.
Half past two is much too late!
Get it done by half past eight.

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread;
Then whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.

Cock a doodle doo!

Cock a doodle do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
My master's lost his fiddlestick,
And knows not what to do.
 

Glossary

cobbler: a cobbler is a person who makes and mends shoes
broth: soup
dame: wife
fiddlestick: a bow used to play a violin or fiddle

NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10

A student:

  • communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations EN1-1A
  • plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers EN1-2A                       
  • recognises a range of purposes and audiences for spoken language and recognises organisational patterns and features of predictable spoken texts EN1-6B  
  • identifies how language use in their own writing differs according to their purpose, audience and subject matter EN1-7B
  • recognises that there are different kinds of texts when reading and viewing and shows an awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter EN1-8B

Students: 

EN1-1A

Develop and apply contextual knowledge

  • listen for specific purposes and information, including instructions, and extend students' own and others' ideas in discussions (ACELY1666)   

Respond to and compose texts

  • describe in detail familiar places and things
  • use a comment or a question to expand on an idea in a discussion
  • contribute appropriately to class discussions
  • carry out complex instructions involving more than one step

EN1-2A 

Respond to and compose texts

  • draw on personal experience and topic knowledge to express opinions in writing
  • compose texts supported by visual information (e.g. diagrams and maps) on familiar topics

EN1-6B

Respond to and compose texts

  • explain personal opinions orally using supporting reasons, simple inferences and reasonable prediction
  • demonstrate active listening behaviours and respond appropriately to class discussions
  • recognise and respond to instructions from teachers and peers
  • listen to, recite and perform poems, chants, rhymes and songs, imitating and inventing sound patterns including alliteration and rhyme (ACELT1585)

EN1-7B

Respond to and compose texts

  • draw on personal experience and feelings as subject matter to compose imaginative and other texts for different purposes
  • compose and review written and visual texts for different purposes and audiences

In each year of Stage 1 students must study examples of:

  • visual texts
  • media, multimedia and digital texts

Across the stage, the selection must give student experience of:

  • an appropriate range of digital texts, including film, media and multimedia

Learning across the curriculum

General Capabilities:

  • creative and critical thinking
  • literacy