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Bodyline cricket series, 1932-33

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In the summer of 1932-1933, a determined English touring side arrived to contest the Ashes Series against an in-form Australian team. These were the days of the legendary Sir Donald Bradman who was then at the peak of his career, averaging above 120 runs an innings.


In an attempt to contain his devastating batting, the English introduced 'bodyline' bowling, delivering a style of attack for the Australian batsmen that changed the nature of cricket.

Bodyline was an aggressive fast bowling style targeting the batsman's body rather than the wicket. Batsmen of the day wore little protection by modern standards. With a packed leg-side field waiting for a catch, there was little even the great Bradman could do but move out of the way as fast as possible. 
While the bodyline tactic succeeded in curtailing Australia's run rate, it caused much controversy. During the 3rd test at Adelaide, Australian captain Bill Woodfull, was struck down by a ball to the chest and the team wicketkeeper, Bert Oldfield, suffered a fractured skull.

The new tactic even split the English side. The fast bowler George 'Gubby' Allen refused to bowl bodyline despite the urgings of his captain, Douglas Jardine. 'Gubby' Allen described Jardine as 'a perfect swine' in a letter to his parents, Sir Walter and Lady Allen.

Allen's letters contrast sharply with reporting of the matches in England. A series of cables were transmitted to Radio Paris from a journalist in Australia, each day, giving a brief description of the day's play. This text of the cable was then broadcast across the Channel to English audiences. The typed transcripts of these broadcasts show that the cables were often censored to erase critical references to the new bodyline bowling tactic.

Transcript: 

'England takes field Friday am 1932-3 English tour of Aust. (Jardine, capt.)' inscribed on reverse in handwritten ink

'England takes field, Friday mor. 1932-3 English tour of Australia (Jardine, capt.)' inscribed on lower edge in handwriten ink probably by a librarian at a later date

England takes the field, 1932 / photographer unknown
1932
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Digital ID: 
a128179
Man holding cricket bat sitting in stands
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Sydney Exposures exhibition caption: A cricketing legend, Sydney, [1932] : Cricketer Donald Bradman is still recorded as being the world's greatest batsman. His batting average of 99.9 runs for 80 Test innings is unrivalled.

Don Bradman with his "Don Bradman" brand Sykes bat
[1932]
Hood, Sam, 1872-1953
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Digital ID: 
a128358
Old photo of a crowd sitting in their suits and hats attending a cricket match
13. Members Stand packed for Test, 8 December 1932 in Hood Collection part II : [Sports, Cricket]
ca. 1925-ca. 1950
Hood, Sam, 1872-1953
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Digital ID: 
a372003
Dense crowd at SCG for test cricket
1930s ?
Hood, Sam, 1872-1953
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Digital ID: 
hood_07649
3 men in a game of cricket one running with the bat, the wicket keeper is looking at another man who missed stopping the ball
70. Wyatt gets out past O'Reilly in slips in Hood Collection part II : [Sports, Cricket]
ca. 1925-ca. 1950
Hood, Sam, 1872-1953
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Digital ID: 
a372018
Bradman and Stan McCabe take the field
18/10/1932
Hood, Sam, 1872-1953
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Digital ID: 
hood_02355

Bodyline cables

Due to restrictions on commercial radio in the United Kingdom in the 1930s, radio stations were established on the continent to beam programs directly to the United Kingdom. The main station was situated in Paris. One of its advertisers was the Gillette Safety Razor Co. which sponsored reporting of the controversial 1932-33 cricket series played between Australia and England in Australia. These were the days before live radio and television broadcasts of international sporting events. Each day a reporter cabled very brief descriptions of play to Paris where they were transformed into full scripts which were then broadcast to the United Kingdom.

Transcript: 

January 2nd, 1933. 3rd day Broadcasting.
2 mbcg ck to follow 2 1605

fine cool attendance tremendous prestart allen richardson oreilly 30 bowes four extras five 169 add bowling oreilly 24/3 63 17 5 grimmett 16 21 4 one innings soon over allen splendidly caught longon oreilly ovation fingleton woodfull opened jardine surprised beginning allen instead voce fourth ball snick shortstop fingleton caught jardine frequent changes field meet peculiarities batmen obrien bowled insignificant ball woodfull bradman full confidence sounder intense enthusiasm every stroke bowlers field keenest no leg theory lunch 2/65 postlunch great duel larwood bradman crowd silent partnership 51/55 minutes broken allen catching woodfull leg inswinger sudden change fortunes mccabe bowled good length 4/81 bowling accurate steady 100 117 minutes bradman 50/93 minutes batsmen gradually mastered attack losing no opportunities taking no risks 50 partnership 41 minutes then richardson leg hammond invaluable innings 2/4 bradman brilliant nought 150 154 minutes upholding one end best form fielding splendid wyatt brilliant game swing largely englands favor tea 7/163 with first innings

p.1 Jan. 2, 1933 (3rd day broadcasting) in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295001
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Transcript: 

3rd. day Broadcasting (con.)

advantage australia 223 runs on fingleton ames allen one 1/1 woodfull allen larwood 26 3/78 obrien larwood eleven 2/27 bradman 77 mccabe allen nil 4/81 richardson leg hammond 32 5/135 oldfield voce six 6/150 grimmett voce nil 7/156 wall two extras eight 7/163 tea + 1/1 woodfull allen larwood 26 3/78 obrien larwood eleven 2/27 bradman 77 mccabe allen nil 4/81 richardson leg hammond 32 5/135 oldfield voce six 6/150 grimmett voce nil 7/156 wall two extras eight 7/163 tea + keenest interest only accurate bowling accountable collapse various partnerships began well but broken just looked dangerous extraordinary contest bradman 103 wall leg hammond three 8/184 oreilly ames hammond nil 9/186 ironmonger outrun nil extras nine 10/191 + larwood 15 two 50 two allen 12 one 44 two bowes 4 nil 20 nil voce 15 two 47 two hammond 10/5 two 21 3 attendance 68188 L 5790 intense enthusiasm bradman century 7/4 185 minutes sutcliffe 20 leyland two 0/22 idea replacing wyatt with leyland opening batsman was

p.2 3rd day broadcasting cont. in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295002
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Transcript: 

3rd. day Broadcasting (con.)

unsettle attack with lefthander sutcliffe much improved saturdays play confident bowling steady fielding keen sutcliffe 33 leyland 10 0/43 wall three nil 15 nil oreilly six two ten nil ironmonger five three seven nil grimmett two nil eleven nil +

p.3 3rd day broadcasting cont. in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295003
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Transcript: 

December 30th.1932 1st day Broadcasting
Melbournecg152/149 30 1610

Fine warm 50000 before toss wicket good larwood voce fastest making ball fly adopted leg theory attack virulent batsmen ultra cautious 42 prelunch record low scoring batsmen frequently hit by ball only one four ingleton stubbornest woodfull just settling when bowled off pads larwood twice burst boots faulty ball replaced after two overs post lunch fingleton caught wyatt noball 27 lunch score 1/42 slowest record obrien outrun hesitating call by fingleton bradman crudest stroke first ball bowes wild pull missed crowd bitterly disappointed england decided advantage 3/67 poor result perfect wicket fingleton 50 141 minutes grand defence riskless wearing down attack fielding admirable nothing given away fingleton mccabe 50/52 minutes scoring rate steadily increasing as attack lost virility partnership firmly established tea fingleton 67 mccabe 24 3/120 fingleton 67 woodfull allen ten 1/29 obrien outrun ten 2/67 bradman bowes nil 3/67 mccabe 24 extras nine 3/120 tea +
Ln ps ord 22 Melbournecg 81/79 30 1704
Posted eleven added mccabe easily slip jardine partnership 64/76 minutes voce injured righthand fielding unserious larwood resumed scoring slow hard toiling weather warming hundreds fainted in dense throng contest always interesting bowlers making batsmen

2nd Test ~ Dec. 30, 1932 (1st day broadcasting) in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295004
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Transcript: 

3rd. day Broadcasting (con.)

unsettle attack with lefthander sutcliffe much improved saturdays play confident bowling steady fielding keen sutcliffe 33 leyland 10 0/43 wall three nil 15 nil oreilly six two ten nil ironmonger five three seven nil grimmett two nil eleven nil +

1st day broadcasting cont. in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295005
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Transcript: 

January 14th. 1933. 2nd. day Broadcasting.
22 adelaideoval 124 14 1525

scoring steady paynter 50 118 minutes 6/4 verity strong defence straight bat bowling accurate oreilly missed verity 16, second slip ironmonger paynter leghit four oreilly partnership 50/75 minutes verity becoming aggressive squarecut four paynter 2/4 grimmett 300 370 minutes lunch 7/315 paynter 72 verity 35 post lunch runs slowly paynter caught leg pulling rising ball 185 minutes 9/4 partnership 96 133 minutes verity caught square leg innings closed 3/12 cool fine perfect 40000 start paynter fingleton wall 77 8/324 verity richardson wall 45 voce wall eight larwood three extras 15 total 341 wall 34/1 10 72 five oreilly 50 19 82 two ironmonger 20 six 50 one grimmett 28 six 94 two mccabe 14 three 28 nil oreilly four noballs wall three + fingleton woodfull opened bowling larwood allen fingleton bad stroke caught short stop sensation larwood off field struck woodfull over heart second over crowd hooted third over larwood six men onside bradman shortleg allen + mccabe off handle caught shortleg voce three men close in leg bowling leg theory woodfull constant pain rubbing breast

3rd Test ~ Jan. 14, 1933 (2nd day broadcasting)
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295006
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Transcript: 

2nd. day Broadcasting (con.)

ord 25 adelaideoval 14 14 1554

fingleton ames allen nil 1/1 woodfull 10 bradman allen larwood eight 2/18 +
woodfull 16 mccabe jardine larwood eight 3/34 ponsford one sundries three 3/36 + woodfull bowled off stump 89 minutes plucky display after painful injury game definitely englands favour ponsford richardson steady opposition + woodfull allen 22 4/51 ponsford 20 richardson 7 extras five 4/70 + ponsford 38 richardson 19 extras five 4/100 voce left field 4/45 recurrence leg injury brown fielding 100 up in 142 minutes + ponsford 45 richardson 21 4/109 allen 2/37 hammond 0/15 +

2nd day broadcasting cont. in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295007
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Transcript: 

Jan. 16, 1933. 3rd day Broadcasting

ord5 adelaideoval 87 16 1335
fine warmer perfect 25000 start runs slowly larwood allen bowling feeling bitter woodfull declining warners sympathy saturday replying not discuss one side unplaying cricket ruining game time decent men get out game richardson onplayed allen shattered australian hopes ponsford 50 122 inutes bowling frequently changed batsmen cautious scoring slow field well placed but runs steadily partnership ponsford oldfield added 50/56 minutes lunch still together great enthusiasm crowd applauded loudly as players came in ponsford 80 richardson allen 28 5/131 oldfield 26 extras 13 5/185 lunch + post lunch voce hammond bowled nip added ponsford glancing bowled 216 mintues 8/4 invaluable warner officially states woodfull expressed regret today saturdays incident now closed all best friends paynter injured ankle left field badly sprained ponsford voce 85 6/194 oldfield 37 grimmett voce allen 14 7/212 sundries 14 7/212 three oclock +
oldfield retired hurt 41 wall hammond six 9/222 oreilly larwood nil 8/222 ironmonger nil total 222 when 41 oldfield struck head ball larwood staggered fell crowd hooting field crowded round after five minutes oldfield supported by woodfull walked off holding towel to head play resumed crowd still hooting paynters injury

Jan. 16, 1933 (3rd day broadcasting) in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295008
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Transcript: 

unserious returned field cheered oreilly swishing clean bowled wall clean bowled innings closed half past three + bowling larwood 25 six 55 three allen 23 four 71 four hammond 12/4 30 one voce 14 five 21 one verity 16 seven 31 nil + correct grimmett ten oldfield not resuming richardson keeping england second at 3/50 warners statement alleged unendorsed woodfull officials uncomment sutcliffe four jardine nil 0/4 four oclock + 
Jardine 12 sutcliffe obrien wall seven 1/7 wyatt 29 1/50 oldfield sent home ambulance 50/56 minutes obrien substitute magnificent running catch deep leg sutcliffe order changed wyatt next obrien cheered uproariously noble evening press writes heading preventable brutality declares jardine responsible vicious methods introduced incidents 14 wyatt 36 extras five 1/62 scoring slowest riskless 11/25 minutes crowd silent quarter past five + jardine 18 in 106 minutes wyatt 42 in 90 minutes extras seven 1/74 at 5/40 scoring monotonous 22/50 minutes batsmen blocking consistently crowd watching silent bowling frequently changed unavailingly +

p.4 3rd day broadcasting cont. in Gillette Safety Razor Company - Cables and radio scripts concerning the 'bodyline' cricket series, 1932-1933
1932-1933
Gillette Safety Razor Company
Digital ID: 
a295009
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Bill O'Reilly (1905-1992)

Bill O'Reilly was rated by Don Bradman as the best bowler he had ever faced. His only rival as the greatest leg spinner in the history of the game is Shane Warne. At 6 ft 2 inches with an intimidating manner his style of spin was never 'gentle'.

Between 1927 and 1946, O'Reilly captured 774 first class wickets at only 16.6 runs per wicket. In 27 test matches against England, South Africa and New Zealand his haul was 144 wickets at 22.59. Even in the controversial 1932-33 Bodyline series he took 27 wickets.
In 1946, at the age of 40, O'Reilly played in his last test against New Zealand. He later worked as a sports journalist until his retirement in 1988.

'Gubby' Allen (1902-1989)

Although a member of the English team, Gubby Allen was born in Sydney. His full name was George Oswald Browning Allen and his nickname was derived from his initials (he was also known as 'Obbie'). At the age of seven Allen was taken to England to be educated.

Allen played his first test for England in 1930 and was one of four fast bowlers on the 1932-33 tour of Australia. Although he consistently refused to bowl bodyline he ended the test series with 21 wickets, second only to Harold Larwood.

Throughout the tour he wrote weekly letters to his parents in which he gave an inside account of the bodyline tour. The letters reveal the deep divisions created in the English team by his stand and by the whole controversy.

Letter from Gubby Allen to his father

Transcript: 

ML MSS 5571 (Gubby Allen)

Pier Hotel
Glenelg
South Australia
Jan 12 1932[3]

Plum sends his love.

Darling Dad,
I had the most depressed letters from you and Mum this mail which really rather amused me. It was very sweet of you both to be so upset about what because Warwick Armstrong said wrote some utter rot about my running on the wicket. Actually there was no trouble about it at all. Woodfull just said, "be sure to keep wide of the wicket" upon to which I I so replied "we have got to bat last so I am not likely to make a spot for Grimmett if I can help it". The subject never came up again or in the 2nd Test and noone everbowled pitched a ball in the crack during either match. I saw W. Armstrong today and asked what trivel [drivel] what he was going to work up this time: he had a good deal

Letter from Gubby Allen to his father, Jan. 12, 1933 ~ Jan. 12, 1933, pg.1 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294001
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Transcript: 

to say but I left him to tell the groundsman. The newspapers & general public in this country, though they have all been exceedingly nice to me, are simply dreadful & far worse than in England. They never leave Douglas Jardine alone for a minute and they publish the most unfounded statements which are certainly libelous but, of course, one can do nothing about it. D.R.J. asks for it with his (offensive) manner and is then hurt when they say nasty things about him. I certainly was depressed for a short time after the 1st Test as I bowled very badly & thought there was no chance of my playing again in a test out here. Now it looks as though I shall play in several as I have been picked to play again tomorrow in the 3rd Test. They have left out Pataudi For Paynter, which I am all against; though Pataudi has not once impressed me the same may be said of Paynter and he has not made nearly as many runs. I have also noted that the English papers talk

pg.2 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294002
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Transcript: 

of me bowling leg theory & bumpers. That is all nonsense. I will now tell you the a story of what occurred on the morning of the 2nd Test to prove that to you I didn't tell you last week as I thought you might worry but, as now the leg theory is dying & the trouble is therefore very unlikely to reoccur [recur]you need have no fears.
D.R.J. came to me and said the following. "I had a talk with the boys, Larwood & Voce, last night and they say it is all quite absurd you not bowling "bouncers" it is only they say it is only because you are keen on your popularity". Well! I burst and said (a good deal about swollen headed gutless uneducated miners and that if it had been a question only of brushed up by day & popularity I could have bowled "bouncers" years ago. I concluded by saying if he didn't like the way I

pg.3 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294003
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pg.4 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a294004
Transcript: 

doing it. Everyone is fed up with Douglas and there looks like being a fine row in the very near future especially if we lose this test. No one knows of my row with Douglas except Plum who I went & told officially directly afterwards. He besought me to do nothing & I said I would drop it but in the event of the matter coming up again nothing would prevent a nasty scene & the world would know what it was all about it. The paper reporters love me out here specialy because I don't bowl leg theory & would love a story of that sort. It could easily be got to them without any interviews but don't worry I couldn't make a fool of myself. I am sorry Mum has not been too well but that will be all over, I sincerely hope, before

pg.5 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294005
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Transcript: 

you receive this. Tell her this story about Clara Cuilen it may make her laugh. She indecipherable met a very nice & amusing man, who was on the boat with us coming out, and was flattered when she was told that he wanted to talk to her. When she he said "I have always wanted to have a talk with you to try & find out just why you were so the most unpopular people person on the boat", she was not so pleased. I went down to Sorrento again last week-end, as I got out of going to Bendigo on the ground that my leg was not too sound, and had a 3 lovely days in the sun. The Baillieus are very nice and have been very kind to me.
We had a good journey over here, except when we passed through a dust storm.
I am still enjoying every minute of the trip. I am off to stay week end with the Davidson at Victor Harbour a lovely seaside resort 70 miles from here. They are friends of Joyce Verney. I hope I do well in the Test. Best love to Mum. Love Obbie

pg.6 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294006
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Transcript: 

Pier Hotel
Glenelg
South Australia
Jan 18th 1932
Darling Dad,
I shall start this now and finish it when I get a chance. I am at present sitting in the press box with Arthur Mailey watching Ames & Verity bat in our 2nd innings. They have put on 89 so far and this is the second time in the match that Verity has astonished everyone by batting like an opening batsman. It has been a most unpleasant match as you have gathered from the papers. There has been nothing but rows & barracking until I am fed up with everything to do with cricket. As you will see from the enclosed paper, which is only a typical example, that the press & [indecipherable] more especially the public are taking their set-backs very badly. (Douglas Jardine is loathed &, between you & me, rightly more than any german who ever fought in any war.) Plum is worried to death and says the side may have to return at once to England, but that is rot. Premiers, Bishops and

Letter from Gubby Allen to his father, Jan. 18, 1933 ~ Jan. 18, 1933, pg.1 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294007
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Transcript: 

the Board of Control are all up in the air. (That famous band of muddlers, i.e. B of Control, have stated that they are preparing a protest against the leg theory which they propose to take to the MCC. If they do, I forecast the following. I think M.C.C. is sure to ask Jardine to abandon it. If they do he says he will resign: at least 6 members of the team will cease to try, rows will follow, and several will be sent home.) I have not changed my mind in any way about the leg theory & all the side is aware of the fact. I just hate it & will not to do it. All the papers, like the one enclosed, have been very nice to me as have the crowds. You will be amused by the cartoon myself out LBW indecipherable The broadcasting men asked me on Monday morning if I had seen in the paper that you had been listening in to my innings & I said "oh, dear and I was out LBW. He says I am always out that way". When I was out again in the 2nd innings this cartoon appeared so I presume he overheard my remark or was told about it. I can't imagine who gave away all the state secrets for the Article enclosed headed "English Team Not happy" as all the facts are accurate. There is no getting away from it Jardine is

pg.2 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294008
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Transcript: 

a perfect swine and I can think of no word fit for him to see which describes him well enough. Plum simply hates the sight of him and so does everyone else. I have never had a scene with him in public but I have had one or two on the quiet of which not a soul knows: in fact we are thought to be good friends. Larwood & I bowled better on the Saturday night, when everyone said the wicket was dead easy and forecasted a huge score, than at any time on the tour. I had Ponsford missed at slip by Hammond & nearly bowled him twice and Richardson was never at home to me. For the third innings running, though I have bowled about the best of the side, I was not given a shot at the tail-enders: that Douglas gives them to the pros to keep their support. So much for the cricket, let's talk about something nice for a change. I went to a party last night and in order to keep the subject conversation off that subject we had a 1/- fine for anyone who brought it up. I now hear the B of Control's protest has gone so

pg.3 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294009
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Transcript: 

I will tell you a bit about that when I hear the details. I am going to stay at Langi Willi with Mrs Blackwood & Jean Russell for the Ballarat match. Freddie Brown is coming too so we may go tomorrow night instead of with all the team on Friday. I feel I want to get away for a bit and also it would be a great opportunity to go over a big station.
I went down to a place called Victor Harbour on Saturday night after the cricket & stayed with a friend of Joyce indecipherableVerney's (nee V-Smith) for the week-end and had great fun. It was very cold and I enjoyed it but Sorrento & Moombara are much nicer.
I don't think there is any more news. Plum & I have some people to dinner tonight.
Later I need not give you the wording of the B of Control's protest as you will have seen it in every paper. I think they have been very stupid to send it especially without trying having tried to come to some arrangement with Plum, Jardine, Palairet & Woodfull here first. The side, I understand, are considering sending a cable to the M.C.C. committee but if there is anything very definite or out of order Wyatt & I are going to refuse to sign it. (They are such of collection of half-wits that I

pg.4 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294010
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Transcript: 

I doubt if they can word a sensible cable and, if they do, I am sure the M.C.C. will tear it up as Plum is not going to sign it.)
Later
        We polished them off fairly quickly today and "things" meaning troubles, seem a little quieter. The cable from the team to M.C.C. was a very reasonable one so that has passed off all right. What will happen remains to be seen. I came out with 8 for 121 in the match which will give some of the gentlemen (?) of the English press something to think over. I expect they get their laugh later. I shall be in Sydney next Wednesday morning which I am looking forward to. I think I have arranged with Douglas Jardine to play in Ballarat & miss the Sydney match so as not to have too hard a time before the next test. I forgot to say Woodfull was not at all badly hurt by his blow on the chest but

pg.5 in Sir Walter Allen - letters from George 'Gubby' Allen, 1932-33, 1936-37
1932-33, 1936-37
Allen, Walter, Sir
Digital ID: 
a294011
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Cigarette cards

Cigarette cards were highly collectable. These cards were issued with packets of B.V.D. cigarettes. They include many of the principal players in both the Australian and English teams during the 1932-33 series when England, under the captaincy of Douglas Jardine, developed the intimidating tactics known as 'bodyline' to contain the Australian batsmen, particularly Don Bradman.

Bodyline Cricket Cards

D. G. Bradman in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293001
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Verso of Bradman card in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293002
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Jardine in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293003
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Verso of Jardine card in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293004
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Larwood in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293005
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Verso of Larwood card in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
Digital ID: 
a293006
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Voce in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293007
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Verso of Voce card in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293008
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Allen in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293009
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Verso of Allen card in Test cricketers 1932-1933 [picture] : issued with B.D.V. Cigarettes.
1932-1933
Digital ID: 
a293010
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Made possible through a partnership with Sir Ron Brierley