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Life on the land often provided pastoralists with leisure time and an elegant lifestyle.


This played an important part in enticing immigrants who were attracted to the idea of an affluent and gracious way of life in the colony.

George Townshend and the Boydell brothers all made successful colonial marriages, and there were plenty of agreeable colonial 'gentry' who settled in and around the Allyn River district. This provided plenty of social activity.

35-year-old George Townshend was the first to wed. He married 18-year-old Elizabeth Bottrell Manning (1815-1888) at St James' Church, Sydney, on 18 June 1833. A daughter of John Edye Manning, Elizabeth had arrived in Australia with her family in 1829. Three days before the wedding, as per the custom of the day, Townshend had made Trevallyn over to his future wife. Charles Boydell attended the nuptials, noting in his diary that it 'went off as things of that kind usually do - dully enough...'

Scenes in New South Wales, 1856-1857 / Mrs Allan Macpherson
1856-1857
Digital ID: 
a1561014
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Samuel Thomas Gill - original sketches, 1844-1866
1844-1866
Samuel Thomas Gill
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Digital ID: 
a1568002
[Trevallyn], Hunter River, Boydell's old home / [attributed to] Emily Anne Manning?
1839?
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1565002

It's clear from Charles Boydell's journal that, during the years spent setting up Camyr Allyn, he spent some effort searching for a wife from within his own social class. While it is not known how he finally met and wooed his bride, he had stated his intention to marry a colonial girl:

'Men [     ] talking of going to England for a wife would that not be a libel upon the female of our adopted country: where so many...fitting for all societies are daily maturing…..anyone who has known the happiness of a large family would prefer connecting himself here with a family of respectability whose society he might cultivate and would be the cause of making his spouse more content: I often think a person must make use of a little deceit before he can prevail upon a body to renounce all her family & friends for him alone & to give up the company and luxuries she has been accustomed to for the hardships & privations of a settler's life.'

Journal, 1830-1835, by Charles Boydell  Manuscript A 2014

 

On 2 May 1837, Charles Boydell and Elizabeth Macdonald Ritchie (1817-1899) were married by Bishop Broughton at St James' Church, Sydney. Elizabeth Ritchie was very well connected socially; she was the daughter of Harriott Mary Dowling (nee Ritchie), step-daughter of Sir James Dowling, the Chief Justice, and a grand-daughter of John Blaxland of Newington.

William Boydell met his future bride on the voyage out to the colony in 1836. Mary Phoebe Broughton (1820-1867) was the elder daughter of William Grant Broughton, the recently consecrated Bishop of Australia, who was returning to Sydney with his family.

What began as a shipboard friendship between two teenagers, became an eight year and often long distance relationship which culminated in a private wedding ceremony at St James' Church, Sydney, on 18 April 1844.

After the Governor and the Chief Justice, the Bishop of Australia was third in the order of colonial precedence. As such, the Broughton's could be forgiven for their hesitation in granting permission for their daughter to marry a Welsh farmer living on the fringe of the settled area. To assess the kind of life Mary would know in County Durham, the Broughton family paid a visit to the district, staying at Trevallyn and Camyr Allyn, in January 1840.

Throughout the years it took William Boydell to establish Caergwrle homestead, the young couple proved their steadfast affection. With the seal of approval given to the district, the building of a church and burial ground on the property was the final condition to the Bishop's granting permission for the marriage. On April 12, 1844, just four days before their wedding at St James' Church, Sydney, William Boydell transferred one acre of land to the Bishop of Australia. Broughton took a personal interest in the design and construction of the Church of St Mary the Virgin on Allyn, which was consecrated by him on 26 November 1845.

Three months after the Broughtons' visit to County Durham, the Townshend family was increased by the birth of third (& second surviving) daughter, Emily, on May 17 1840. Meanwhile, at Camyr Allyn, Elizabeth Boydell had given birth to her second child on 20 April 1840, a daughter named Harriett Mary. Mary Phoebe Boydell's first daughter, Sarah, was born on 10 April 1845 and, in the years to come, there would be 23 children born into these three families.

 

The company of near neighbours and good friends would have improved the quality of life of all family members. Women living on rural properties often lacked the support of other adult females. Visits to town, and from friends and relatives passing through the district, local parish life and the social round of neighbourhood calls helped ease this isolation.

Blaxland letter

Jane Blaxland wrote this long, chatty letter to her sister Anna Walker, who lived in Tasmania and was unable to attend the Sydney wedding of her niece, Elizabeth Ritchie, to Charles Boydell on 2 May 1837.

Jane has 'cross-hatched' her letter (written in both directions across the page) which was a common paper-saving practice in the 19th century.

In her letter, Jane describes the Boydell wedding as 'the gayest I ever attended'. She provides details of the dresses of the bride and her attendants and notes that the festivities went on for two days. The wedding breakfast for 26 people was followed by a sit-down dinner and an evening party, with many additional guests 'in the way of merry dancing boys & girls'. These included the 'laughing' daughters of Bishop Broughton and Charles Boydell's younger brother, William. The next day there was a picnic at Bondi and the party reassembled for more dinner and dancing at night.

Transcript: 
Newington, 22nd May, 1837 My dear Anna, When I closed my last letter to you, I thought to have written again immediately, but in these busy times a month passes like a few days & I am astonished to think I have not yet fulfilled my promise of giving an account of the wedding, which did not take place 'till the 2nd of this month - it certainly was the gayest I ever attended and we kept it up for two days in good old style according to Mr Dowling's wish - We behaved most admirably on the occasion from the beginning to the end of the two days! and Harriotte bore the fatigue and anxiety of the whole affair with astonishing spirit and fortitude - the Breakfast she provided was handsome and well served - the Dinner good, and the Evening party very pleasant, now this, added to marrying a Daughter, was really much business for one day. The number at breakfast was 26, the only persons besides members of the Family were the Bishop, Mr Cartwright (his clergyman) and Mr & Mrs Townshend, Mr Boydell's most particular Friends, and the only persons he invited - nearly the same party assembled at dinner - in the Evening we had many
Blaxland Family - Papers, 1837-1923
1837 - 1923
Blaxland family
Digital ID: 
a1571001
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Transcript: 
Newington, 22nd May, 1837 My dear Anna, When I closed my last letter to you, I thought to have written again immediately, but in these busy times a month passes like a few days & I am astonished to think I have not yet fulfilled my promise of giving an account of the wedding, which did not take place 'till the 2nd of this month - it certainly was the gayest I ever attended and we kept it up for two days in good old style according to Mr Dowling's wish - We behaved most admirably on the occasion from the beginning to the end of the two days! and Harriotte bore the fatigue and anxiety of the whole affair with astonishing spirit and fortitude - the Breakfast she provided was handsome and well served - the Dinner good, and the Evening party very pleasant, now this, added to marrying a Daughter, was really much business for one day. The number at breakfast was 26, the only persons besides members of the Family were the Bishop, Mr Cartwright (his clergyman) and Mr & Mrs Townshend, Mr Boydell's most particular Friends, and the only persons he invited - nearly the same party assembled at dinner - in the Evening we had many additions in the way of merry dancing Girls and Boys - Mrs Broughton and her laughing daughters were amongst them - I wish exceedingly you and all your little party had also been amongst the number, Brother Walker too would have enjoyed it or I am much mistaken - Mr D was so elated that he proposed the party should assemble the following evening, which was gladly seconded by all - so after a picnic in Bondi Bay given by John & exceedingly pleasant we all met and danced the second evening most merrily away - the next day as you may fancy we were completely exhausted and glad to get home - I think I was never more fatigued. Poor Alick was the only one that suffered pain for all this pleasure, and he was very imprudent in the midst of a multitude of good things, and brought on a sharp attack of dysentery from which he is not yet recovered in strength - but I have not told you how well the Bride and Bridegroom behaved - most admirably and they looked so well! and spoke with such steady audible voices and did not shed a tear - now this according to my idea is most proper and they had my admiration the whole time. The Bridesmaides (sic) were first Eliza Dowling and Elizabeth Forster, next Martha and Susan all in white and then Loo, and I, in pale lilac which with the Bride's beautiful worked muslin pelisse
Blaxland Family - Papers, 1837-1923
1837 - 1923
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Digital ID: 
a1571002
Transcript: 
pelisse over canary satin made a delicate assembly of colours and looked extremely well ranged around the altar where nine and twenty were standing of all ages from our dear Father who leaning on his stick looked a noble Patriarch in the midst of the group, down to Baby [Breton] who Mr Boydell begged might be present with [Eckards] old Mary Jones and her daughter Harriotte. Oh that with my pencil I could give you an idea of this most interesting assembly I ever beheld - there was almost every variety of Friendship, relationship and connection. The Grandfather acting as Father in giving away the Grandchild in the presence of the Mother, Grandmother, Step Father, Brothers, [Step Brothers], & Sisters (acting as bridesmaides) Uncles (John her guardian) Aunts (Bridesmaides) and cousins also Bridesmaides down to the third generation, with Friends and humble Friends good old Mary aside J Forster & Cousin were also there & George Gregory. Such a peculiar group is not twice seen in one's life - the Bishop was much pleased, and said he never attended so pleasant a wedding in his life - Baby was quite astonished and paid great attention to the whole ceremony she was perfectly quiet with surprise, and now tells every one she is married to the little ugly old man in the black and white petticoat meaning the Bishop and asks why he kept nodding his head over the book, a peculiar motion of the head he has while reading, which did not escape her - she is much improved since you saw her, both in temper and appearance - we had a letter from her Papa the other day wherein he says he shall not come out to join his regiment here as he first intended but he proposes going from England to India and returning here in 3 years should the climate spare him - his health seems improved and he and he does not seem to be thinking of marrying as it was reported, Mama, I think I told you of the pleasant letters we lately received from Mary & Polly's Billy Molle, as Baby says, her health seems quite restored by the Voyage, and she seems favourably impressed with the new world around her. Colonel Handson was exceedingly kind to them, on landing he was the first person they met on the Beach - he was waiting with his carriage to take them to Colonel Cadell's house, Mr Molle's uncle, with whom they were living when they wrote. You will be surprised when I tell you I am sitting alone in this large dining room the only one in the House - the blaze of the Fire and [Tas/Tat] snoring at my feet are the only sounds to be heard - Papa & Mama went to Luddenham this morning. John, George, and Arthur are at the Hunter, and Loo, & Uncle are dining with a party at the Bowermans - Alas! how the change that a few years has wrought with us strikes me now but I will not be unmindful of the many and great blessings yet spared to us, or I should be, than I am still less worthy. We have not heard from you lately - we shall be very anxious till we hear you are safe over your confinement - I should like much to be with you - but this is more than I can accomplish - Papa every day seems to dislike more the idea of our leaving home even for a short time we have not been from home on a visit, but once since you left and then I went with Eliza to the Campbelle's for only a few days - Louisa and I can never again go on a visit together as we once did we do not think it right to leave Papa & Mama, altho they are enjoying better health than usual just now - Papa's leg is well again I am glad to say - he walks without a stick - Tell Susan - her Mother & Brothers are quite well they are living with Mr Riddle, her Mother as laundress and her Brothers to do anything their strength will admit of - Mr R says he is very much pleased with them they are so respectable in their conduct in general - I wish Mama had been fortunate enough to get them.
Blaxland Family - Papers, 1837-1923
1837 - 1923
Blaxland family
Digital ID: 
a1571003
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Transcript: 
Now my dear sister I have written myself sleepy and stupid so I will wish you good night and god bless you, Brother Walker, and all your dear children and believe me my dear Anna ever your affectionate Sister Jane Blaxland. Pencil Note: Aunt Jane Blaxland's account of Cousin Eliza Boydell's Wedding
Blaxland Family - Papers, 1837-1923
1837 - 1923
Blaxland family
Digital ID: 
a1571004
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Broughton diary

This diary was kept by Mary Phoebe Broughton in 1839-1841. It is one of a series diaries she kept between 1834-1841 as a record of daily events.

Prior to marriage, the daughters of gentlemen were shielded from contact with strangers and, ideally, met no one who was not a relative or a close family friend. Mary Phoebe's diary shows that in social situations she & her sister always remained safely within a circle of family & friends.

In this section of her diary, Mary Phoebe records the Broughton family's visit to the Allyn River in January 1841. She documents the journey to and from Sydney, and the endless round of visits to and from other settlers. It provides wonderful insight into the social world of early colonial rural NSW, and suggests that the presence of two eligible young ladies might have caused some excitement amongst the many bachelors in the region.

>View the complete record for the Broughton Diary 

Transcript: 
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603002
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Transcript: 
[January, 1841] 10th Mama, Emily, Miss Macquoid and Louisa went into Sydney in our carriage - I was not well in the morning with a pain in my side, & Mama sent for Mr Mitchell, who came to see me. 11th Mr Mitchell, & Mr R. Campbell called - Papa went into Sydney twice - Mr Lethbridge sent his carriage to take us on board the steamer at 7, our's having gone to be put on board first - Mr Townshend, Miss Bell &etc. were on board with us - we had a very rough night. 12th Sunday - We arrived at Newcastle between 10 and 11 & went to Mr W. Scott's, where we had breakfast - Papa went to church & preached. We were too tired to go in the morning, but all went in the afternoon. Papa preached again - Mr & Mrs Erskine and Captain Hollingsworth called. A brickfielder & rain in the afternoon. 13th A very showery day - The Confirmation was obliged to be put off on account of the rain. In the afternoon we managed to walk as far as Mrs Erskine's and Mrs Croasdill's - Emily & I drank tea at Mrs Erskine's - Mr Digby, Miller, Miss Bidwill & Miss [Tuches] were there. Mr Spencer dined at the Scott's. 14th Mama, E & I went for a walk on the sands
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603061
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Transcript: 
with Mr Scott, after which we went to the church, where Papa held a confirmation - we called on Mrs Wilton & visited the school - Mama, E & I, Mr Scott & Mr Spencer went over to the other side of the harbour by water in the afternoon. Many persons called whilst we were out. Mr Wilton and Mr Spencer dined with us. 15th A showery day - We left Newcastle in a large six oared boat with Captain Furlong, Mr Spencer & Mr Nagel, & a large party on other boats followed - We all landed at Ash Island, where we had luncheon under the verandah, soon after which we took our leave & were conveyed by water to Mr Scott's stables, where our carriage met us, & took us to a little inn near, to sleep - we were prevented from going on to Morpeth by the rain which continued all night. 16th Another showery day - We proceeded to Mr Rusden's at East Maitland, where we had luncheon, & then went on to Mr Close's at Morpeth - Mr Spence dined there. 17th Papa went over the West Maitland to hold a confirmation - Miss Grace Rusden, & Mrs Rusden called
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603062
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Transcript: 
at Mr Close's, also Mr Smith from Paterson - Mr & Mrs Rusden, Mr Stack, Mr Bolton & Mr Spencer dined with us. We spent the evening in the verandah. 19th Sunday - A very warm day, particularly towards afternoon - We attended service at East Maitland school house. Mr Rusden read, & Papa preached - after which we took leave of Papa & returned to Mr Close's to dine - We attended after[noon] service in the school house at Morpeth - Mr Rusden read & preached Miss Georgiana came over with her papa to church. 20th A tremendously hot wind all day - we could not leave the house The Dowling's arrived at Aulaby's Inn from Camyr Allyn, & proceeded to Sydney next morning in the Steamer - Mr Townshend arrived at Morpeth late in the evening. 21st Altogether a much cooler day - We were up very early, & expected Mr Townshend at ½ past 6, but he was unable to come till about ½ past 7, when we left Mr Close's & after crossing the river in the punt, found Mr T's Carriage waiting for us, in which we proceeded to Paterson
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603063
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Transcript: 
where we had luncheon & called on Mrs Smith & family - a few miles from Paterson we met the two Mr Boydells, & Mr B brought us the rest of the way to Trevallyn in his carriage with four horses - We walked in the garden before dinner - Mr & Mrs Boydell & Mr W. Boydell dined with us. A wet night. 22nd Cloudy day - Mama was not well, & was obliged to remain upstairs - Mr R Massie called. Mr & Mrs Townshend, E & I took a drive over to Mr Boydell's in the afternoon - John Lyon dined and slept at Mr Townshend's A thunderstorm in the evening & a great deal of rain. 23rd, 24th, 25th Very wet days - we could hardly get out even into the garden. 26th Sunday - Mr Townshend read prayers & a sermon in the morning - A very wet day - Mr Crowder arrived from Merton - wet through. Mr Townshend prayer & sermon again in the evening. 27th Showery day - the two Mr Boydell's called - Mr B took Mr Crowder away with him - Wm Boydell stayed to dine and sleep. Mr Durbin also dined and slept at Trevallyn. 28th Rain again - We played billiards in the morning -
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603064
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Transcript: 
Mr Durbin and B went away after luncheon - 29th Very wet day - The two Mr Boydells rode over to Trevallyn in the afternoon. 30th Mr Durbin called - Wm Boydell took me for my first ride on Hector, & afterwards Emily took a ride - A very pleasant day - Mr & Mrs Boydell, Mr Crowder & Mr Durbin called at Trevallyn in the evening. Wm B. dined with us. 31st Wm Boydell came to fetch Emily & me for a ride & we rode with him to Camyr Allyn - Mama, Mr & Mrs Townshend came over to dine at the Boydell's & returned to Trevallyn at night, but E & I remained. 1st Mr Boydell went to fetch Mama in his carriage. The two Mr Bs, E & I took a delightful ride to the water-fall in the evening. A strong southerly gale in the evening. 2nd Sunday - Mr Boydell read prayers in the morning - John Lyon came over from his brother's to stay at Mr Boydell's - We dined early & afterwards all went for a walk. Captain Evans & Mr Russell arrived at Camyr Allyn. 3rd Mama, Mr & Mrs Boydell & Captain Evans went in the carriage & Emily & I, B & Mr Russell rode to the village of Gresford that is to be - John Lyon came to meet us & rode back with us. Mrs Townshend called. 4th Captain Evans & Mr Russell left Camyr Allyn - Mr Boydell & John Lyon went to a sale of cattle & did not return till late to dinner - Emily & I & B took a ride to Caergwyrle (sic).
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603065
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Transcript: 
5th Dr Campbell called - Mr & Mrs Boydell, Wm Boydell, Mama, E & I & Mr Lyon went in the afternoon to the water-fall where we had our dinner, & afterwards a delightful walk home in the cool of the evening - Emily had a letter from Louisa Macquoid. 6th A hot wind. Mr Townshend, Mr Glennie, Mr Fenwick, two Captain Champagne's (sic), & Mr goldfinch called. Emily wrote to Louisa Macquoid & sent it by Captain C. A delightful southerly breeze in the evening. 7th Mrs Wright's birthday 23 7th E & I & Wm Boydell & John Lyon rode over to Trevallyn to see Mrs Townshend. Mr L went on to Paterson & we returned without him - Mr Boydell went over to Glendon to fetch Papa. Mr Taylor & Mr Durbin called - Mr Hamon Massie & Mr Crowder came to dine & sleep at Camyr Allyn. 8th E & I & Mr Lyon & Wm Boydell rode over to Caergwyrle (sic) after breakfast - Mr Durbin & Mr Taylor called - had luncheon. Mr Townshend called & Mr Crowder called & Mrs T, Mary & Georgy - Mr H. Massie, Mr Arnold, Mr Crowder called - Mr Durbin & James Lyon dined with us - the latter slept here. Mr Boydell returned without Papa. 9th Sunday - A very hot day - Mr Boydell read prayers in the morning - James Lyon dined & slept at Camyr Allyn, his brother also being with us.
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603066
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Transcript: 
10th Another very hot day - we could not go out. James Lyon returned home after breakfast. Mr Durbin dined with us. 11th Emily & I went for a ride with Wm Boydell to the top of a hill from which we had a beautiful view of Trevallyn &etc. Rather a cloudy day. Mr Robert Massie called. Mr Rolleston dined with us. 12th Mr Durbin called. E & I & B & Mr Lyon went for a ride after luncheon. Whilst we were at dinner Mr & Mrs A. Glennie passed by on their way home & left a letter from Papa dated Dulwich. 13th A hot day. Mr Townshend and Captain Champaine called on their way down from the Allyn Dr Park dineed with us. Mr Rolleston dined with us and remained all night. A thunderstorm in the afternoon. 14th It rained hard nearly all day. Mr Boydell, Wm. Boydell & John Lyon went off early to meet Papa on his way from Glendon & after meeting with many difficulties on account of the state of the road they arrived at Camyr Allyn late to dinner. 15th It rained on the morning, but was fine in the afternoon. Mr Townshend called Emily & I went out riding in turns on Hector with Wm. Boydell. Mr & Mrs Tonwshend & John Lyon dined with us. 16th A most beautiful day - Papa & Mama went over to Trevallyn in Mr Townshend's carriage,
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603067
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Transcript: 
Emily & I followed with the Boydells in their carriage with 4 horses - Papa performed service in the Townshend's verandah & in the afternoon they came over to Camyr Allyn where Papa again performed service. Mr & Mrs Glennie, Mr Durbin, Mr John Lyon dined and slept. 17th Another beautiful day - Emily & I went out riding with Wm. Boydell. Mr Townshend fetched Papa & Mama in his carriage to see the Village and they went on to dine at Trevallyn. Emily & I went with the Boydells in their carriage. The two Mr Lyons, Mr & Mrs Fenwick, Mr Durbin also dined at Mr Townshends. 18th Papa , Mama & Mr & Mrs Boydell drove the Caergwyle (sic). Emily & I & Bo, set off after them on horseback but Hector gave me a hurdle just as we were starting which delayed us, so we were only able to go to meet them as they returned. 19th Bo. went to Caergwyle (sic) before breakfast. A very hot day and a very unhappy one. Poor Bo. left Camyr Allyn at 2 o'clock on Thursday in order to get to Morpeth in time for the Sydney steamer. 20th Dreadfully hot morning - This day was 4 years we went on board the Camden. Mr Boydell drove Papa to Paterson. A southerly wind & rain came on soon after they were gone. Mr B. returned to dinner. 21st Mr Boydell, Emily & I rode to see Mr Fenwick,
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603068
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Transcript: 
afterwards went to the Village & Gresford Lodge. Mr Townshend & Mr Fenwick rode with us. Mr Crowder & John Lyon dined and slept at Mr Boydell's. 22nd Mr Boydell, John Lyon & Mr Crowder went away before breakfast, & went down in a boat with Mr Townshend to meet the William steamer coming up to Paterson. Mama, Mrs B., E & I walked in the garden in the afternoon. The three gentlemen returned to dinner - 23rd Sunday Mr Boydell read prayers in the morning . A very hot day - Mr & Mrs Townshend, John Lyon Hamon Massie & Mr Durbin dined with us. Mr Crowder went home afterwards. 24th Mr Boydell drove Mama, E & I to Paterson after breakfast. John Lyon & Hamon Massie went with us. We went on board the William the 4th to go to Morpeth but the steamer stuck several times & we were at last obliged to leave her & go to the Inn at Paterson to sleep. 25th We went on board the steamer between 5 and 6 in the morning, and arrived at Mrs Close's to breakfast where Mr Boydell, Mr Lyon, & Mr Massie took leave of us. It rained nearly all day - the Earl Grey arrived at Sydney from England & Miss Davies went to Mr E. Manning's 26th Mama, E & I left Morpeth in the Tamar - Papa came on board at Raymond Terrace & Mr Bloxsome etc. at Newcastle - we arrived in Sydney between 11 & 12 o'clock - came home in a hired carriage - brought Mr Bloxsome as far as King Street with us. 27th Willam Boydell called before returning to the Paterson - Mr Dunn, the Macquiods, Mr Crawley, Mrs Jones ….
Mary Phoebe Broughton - Diary, 1839-1841
1839 - 1841
Mary Phoebe Broughton
Digital ID: 
a1603069
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Manning albums

Emily Anne Manning (? - 1846), sister-in-law to Elizabeth Townshend, visited Trevallyn from March to June 1839. During her visit to County Durham, Emily completed several pencil sketches of Trevallyn - taken from different view points - at least one of which she later worked up into a watercolour. She also made a series of sketches of surrounding stations including Camyr Allyn, the home of Mr & Mrs Townshend's close friends & near neighbours, Charles & Elizabeth Boydell.

The photographs of Trevallyn are taken from an album which may have been compiled by Elizabeth Bottrell Townshend's father, John Edye Manning. Dating from the early 1860s, these images were taken prior to the Townshends' departure for Wales in 1862.

[Views of residences of the Manning family, ca. 1860-1870]
ca. 1860-1880
Manning family
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Digital ID: 
a1180018
[Views of residences of the Manning family, ca. 1860-1870]
ca. 1860-1880
Manning family
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Digital ID: 
a1180019
[Views of residences of the Manning family, ca. 1860-1870]
Manning family
Manning family
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Digital ID: 
a1180020
[Views of residences of the Manning family, ca. 1860-1870]
ca. 1860-1880
Manning family
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Digital ID: 
a1180021
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566039
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566040
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566041
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566042
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566043
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566044
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566046
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566047
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566048
Item 01: Sketchbook with scenes in Europe and New South Wales, 1836-39 / Emily Anne Manning
1836-1839
Emily Anne Manning
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Digital ID: 
a1566049

Made possible through a partnership with Peter Hunt