Newsflashes

Newsflash:

We are open on ANZAC Day from 1pm to 5pm. See our ANZAC Day opening hours for more details.

Architects

Many of the houses in the upper North Shore were designed by leading architects of the day, whose work reflected their own interpretations of an Australian architectural style. Award-winning 19th and 20th century architects who worked in the area included Sir John Sulman, John Horbury Hunt, Augustus Aley, Walter Liberty Vernon, William Hardy Wilson (of Wilson, Neave & Berry), Russell Jack (of Allen Jack & Cottier), John Brogan, Albert Hanson, Leslie Wilkinson, Sydney Ancher, Arthur Baldwinson, Harry Seidler and, more recently, Hugh Buhrich, Glenn Murcutt and Richard Leplastrier.

The architects' designs often took full advantage of the beautiful, natural settings of their North Shore locations. The wild, rocky terrain of some of the sites, however, made building work difficult. Some of the houses were controversial in their day, attracting the ire of the local council and neighbours alike. Today, the North Shore retains a significant collection of important and heritage-listed properties.

> Read more detailed notes on North Shore Houses & Architects (supported by the Upper North Architects Network, SPUN).

Walter Liberty Vernon

Walter Liberty Vernon (1846-1914), New South Wales Government Architect, was most famous for his grand public works including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, completed in 1909. However his own house, Wendover, built in Normanhurst in 1895, was a more modest affair. Named after a picturesque village in Buckinghamshire, England, the unpretentious exterior belied an elegant interior decorated with antiques and fine furniture. The sprawling grounds featuring large trees and cottage gardens allowed Vernon to indulge his passion for gardening.

 > View full catalogue record for the Vernon family collection

Walter L. Vernon, Government Architect, ca. 1890 / photographer unknown
ca. 1890
Digital ID: 
a4365074
View collection item detail
Vernon family - sketchbooks and photographs relating to family residences, ca. 1880-1935
ca. 1880-1935
Digital ID: 
a2055003
View collection item detail
Vernon family - sketchbooks and photographs relating to family residences, ca. 1880-1935
ca. 1880-1935
Digital ID: 
a2055004
View collection item detail

William Hardy Wilson

Architect William Hardy Wilson (1881-1955) is regarded as one of the leading lights of Australian architecture of the twentieth century. Having travelled in Europe and the United States of America, he was influenced by the Colonial Revival architectural style. 

In 1913 he entered practice with Stacey Neave in George Street, Sydney, attracting mainly residential and small commercial comissions. His admiration of early Australian architecture influenced the designs of his houses. Two of his most well-known works are in Sydney's upper North Shore.

'Eryldene', Gordon, was the North Shore home for his friend Professor E.G. Waterhouse, completed in 1914. Now a heritage-listed museum, it is famous as much for its garden and camellias, as it is for its house design.

Wilson’s own house and garden, 'Purulia', Wahroonga, is said to be one of his best works. When it came to building a house for his own family, he selected an elevated site on Fox Valley Road, overlooking Sydney. Completed in 1916, the Wilson family only lived there until 1922, when it was sold.

The cottage was a simple rectangle in plan with a low pitched roof. At a time when more elaborate housing styles were popular in the area, the simplicity of his house brought opposition from neighbours and the local council. Overall the house was very modern for its time, and later became a prototype for many North Shore homes.

'Purulia' anticipated one of the twentieth century’s biggest social changes – living without servants. the kitchen, for example, was designed as a space for the family to gather together. The design of 'Purulia' and its garden were closely integrated. The garden design is based on formal geometry which complements the rectangular form of the house.

Domestic architecture in Australia / original photographs by H. Cazneaux, [J.] Paton, J. Kauffmann and J. [i.e. A.] Wilkinson
1919
Digital ID: 
a1810015
View collection item detail
"Purulia", Wahroonga [architectural drawings], 1916 / drawn by Wilson, Neave & Berry
1916
Digital ID: 
a2076001
View collection item detail
"Purulia", Wahroonga [architectural drawings], 1916 / drawn by Wilson, Neave & Berry
1916
Digital ID: 
a2076004
View collection item detail

'Eryldene'

Leading architect William Hardy Wilson (1881-1955) designed this house for his friend Professor Eben Gowrie Waterhouse (1881-1977), a lecturer in modern languages and renowned expert on camellias. Completed in 1914, the house was influenced by the colonial revival architectural style which Wilson had seen while travelling in the United States. Now a heritage-listed house, garden and museum, ‘Eryldene’ is probably one of the best-known houses on Sydney’s upper North Shore, famous for its beautiful garden of camellias.

'Eryldene' is a long, low, white house, with a pillared verandah and a flagged path leading to it through a garden brilliant with flowers... It is satisfyingly modern behind its quaint exterior, and its plan and treatment suffer from none of the disabilities usually inseparable from old world houses... In the garden the more ordinary suburban treatment has been happily abandoned in favour of flagged paths, masses of colour in the shape of flowering shrubs in huge tubs, flower beds and borders…It is astonishing what a beautiful and interesting garden can be made on these lines, a source of never-ending joy to its possessor, and incidentally providing an unusual and delightful setting for his home.  

(“Eryldene, a Hardy Wilson House, home of Mr E.G. Waterhouse at Gordon, NSW”, The Australian Home Builder, Jan 1925)

Harold Cazneaux : photographs chiefly of domestic architecture and gardens
Digital ID: 
a2058028
View collection item detail
Harold Cazneaux : photographs chiefly of domestic architecture and gardens
Digital ID: 
a2058029
View collection item detail
Harold Cazneaux : photographs chiefly of domestic architecture and gardens
Digital ID: 
a2058030
View collection item detail
Harold Cazneaux : photographs chiefly of domestic architecture and gardens
Digital ID: 
a2058027
View collection item detail

Rose Seidler house retains a close relationship with two neighbouring Seidler houses, Marcell Seidler House and Julian Rose House, on part of the original 2.6 hectare family estate of natural bushland overlooking the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park. 

In 1967, Harry and Penelope Seidler designed a house for their own family in Kalang Avenue, Killara. Seidler’s architectural practice was thriving and this house represented the state of the art for the period, winning the 1967 Wilkinson Award for Residential Buildings. The family resided in the property for many years and it is still owned by the Seidler family.

...Although located in an established living area, it has no neighbours as it is surrounded by natural bush reserve which assures complete privacy. The site is however, very rugged which would discourage most people from building. In this case this was considered an advantage and even a challenge...

("Architects' own house", Architecture in Australia, April 1968)

 

The State Library of New South Wales has an extensive Harry Seidler collection which includes over 6,000 architectural plans and drawings, photographs, specifications and personal papers. Find out more about Australia's best known modernist architect. 

Made possible through a partnership with Geoffrey & Rachel O'Conor