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Journals from the First Fleet

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The State Library holds the world's largest collection of original First Fleet journals and correspondence.

Of the eleven known journal manuscripts, nine are held in the Mitchell Library and Dixson Library collections, at the State Library of New South Wales.

Of the contemporary records which survive documenting the First Fleet, the original, private manuscript journals written by those who actually sailed with the expedition occupy a central place.

The manuscript journals held by the State Library are written by John Hunter, Second Captain and Philip Gidley King, Second Lieutenant; William Bradley, First Lieutenant; Jacob Nagle, a seaman; and George Worgan, surgeon, all serving on the Sirius; Ralph Clark, Second Lieutenant of Marines on the Friendship; James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on the Prince of Wales; John Easty, private Marine on the Scarborough; and Arthur Bowes Smyth, surgeon on the Lady Penrhyn.

All give insights into shipboard life, the convicts, officers and crew, ports of call, discipline, injuries and deaths and daily life in the colony.

Arthur Bowes Smyth (1750-1790)

Arthur Bowes Smyth sailed with the First Fleet as Surgeon on board the Lady Penrhyn. He was responsible for the women convicts and his record of their names, ages and crimes reveals the human faces of the convict mass. Bowes Smyth also took a great interest in natural history, collecting specimens and making drawings including the earliest extant illustration by a European of the emu.

He returned to England on the Lady Penrhyn travelling via Lord Howe Island, Tahiti, China and St Helena. He died some months after his return and was buried on 31 March 1790 in Tolleshunt D'Arcy, Essex, where he had been born. His journal was acquired by the Mitchell Library in 1915.

Three manuscript versions of this journal are known to exist. Other versions are held at the National Library of Australia (believed to be the original version); and the British Museum (a fair copy). The Mitchell Library version is also believed to be a fair copy.

About this item: 

Arthur Bowes-Smyth, illustrated journal, 1787-1789. Titled `A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, Merchantman William Cropton Sever, Commander by Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon - 1787-1788-1789'; being a fair copy compiled ca 1790.

Extract from, A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, 1787-1789 Manuscript page 1
Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon
Digital ID: 
a1085001
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About this item: 

Arthur Bowes-Smyth, illustrated journal, 1787-1789. Titled `A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, Merchantman William Cropton Sever, Commander by Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon - 1787-1788-1789'; being a fair copy compiled ca 1790.

Transcript: 

[Page 80]

Jany. 18th. A gentle breeze -- Expect to see Land this Evening. A Noddy taken on the yardarm -- No land seen at 8 o'Clock for wh. reason the fleet were order'd to lye to all night -- the wind encreas'd in the night & the Ships roll'd very much. --
Saturday 19th. This morng. I arose at 5 o'Clock in hopes of seeing Land, but was disappointed -- The Sirius & all the fleet made Sail abt. 4 o'Clock in the morng. & at 7 a.m. we discover'd Land abt. 40 miles distant. The joy everyone felt upon so long wish'd for an Event can be better conceiv'd than expressed, particularly as it was the termination of the Voyage to those who were to settle at Botany Bay, &: it is 10 weeks on monday since we left the Cape of Good Hope; the longest period of any we had been at Sea without touching at any Port. -- The Sailors are busy getting up the Cables & preparing all things for Anchor- ing - lye to all night.
Sunday 20th. The Sirius made Sail at 4 o'Clock this morng. wt. a fine breeze go 4 Ks. -- Abt. 8 o'Clock we came abreast of point Solander &: Sail'd into the Arrive at Bay, where we were very happy to find the 4 Ships who had parted wt. Botany Bay us, all safe at Anchor. The Supply Brig got there on friday night, but the Alexr. Scarborough & Friendship reach'd it but the Eveng. before us! We saw by the Assistance of a Glass, 7 of the Natives, runing amongst the trees --

Extract from, A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, 1787-1789, Manuscript page 2
Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon
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Digital ID: 
a1085080
About this item: 

Arthur Bowes-Smyth, illustrated journal, 1787-1789. Titled `A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, Merchantman William Cropton Sever, Commander by Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon - 1787-1788-1789'; being a fair copy compiled ca 1790.

Transcript: 

[Page 81]

This Eveng. I went on Shore in the Boat wt. Some of the Ship's Company to the Northside of the Bay to haul the Seyne &: caught a great many fish; all excellent eating. Upon first sight one wd. be induced to think this a most fertile spot, as there are great Nos. of very large & lofty trees, reachg. almost to the water's edge, & every vacant spot between the trees appears to be cover'd wt. verdure: but upon a nearer inspection, the grass is found long &: coarse, the trees very large & in general hollow & the wood itself fit for no purposes of buildg. or anything but the fire -- The Soil to a great depth is nothing but a black sand wh. when exposed to the intense heat of the Sun by removing the surrounding trees, is not fit for the vegitation of anything even the grass itself, then dying away, wh. in the shade appears green &: flourishing; add to this that every part of the grown is in a manner cover'd wt. black & red Ants of a most enormous size. --
21st. Accompanied several Gentlemen on shore to the South side of the Bay, in order to haul the Seyne. Upon our landing 7 or 8 of the Natives came close up to us -- They were all provided wt. Lances of a great length pointed wt. the Bone of a Sting Ray at one end & a piece of Oyster Shell at the other, grown or rub'd to a fine edge & one of them had a heavy Bludgeon wh. I persuaded him to exchange wt. me for a looking glass. They were all perfectly naked rather slender, made of a dark black colour, their hair not wooly but short & curly. -- Every one had the tooth next the fore tooth in his

Extract from, A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, 1787-1789, Manuscript page 3
Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon
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Digital ID: 
a1085081
About this item: 

Arthur Bowes-Smyth, illustrated journal, 1787-1789. Titled `A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, Merchantman William Cropton Sever, Commander by Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon - 1787-1788-1789'; being a fair copy compiled ca 1790.

Transcript: 

[Page 82]

upper jaw knock'd out, & many of them had a piece of stick abt. the size of a Tobacco pipe & 6 or 8 inches in length run thro' the septum of the Nostrils, to wh. from its great similitude we ludicrously gave the name of a Sprit Sail Yard. They all cut their Backs Bodies & Arm wh. heal up in large ridges & scars.
They live in miserable Wigwams near the water wh. are nothing more than 2 or 3 pieces of the Bark of a tree set up sideways against a ridge pole fasten'd to two upright stick at each end -- they are abt. 2 or 3 feet high, & few amongst them are to be found wh. are weather proof --
Their principal food consists of fish wh. they in general eat raw -- Sometimes they feast upon the Kangaroo, but I believe them to be too stupid & indolent a set of people to be able often to catch them: from the appearance of many of the lofty trees we saw, some way up the Country (vizt.) having regular steps chop'd at abt. 2 foot asunder in the Bark of the tree quite up to the top where the tree begins to branch out, there is reason to suppose they mount these wt. large stones where they lie in ambush till some Kangaroos come under to graze when they heave the stone upon them & kill them. There are great Nos. of Kangaroos but so extreamly shy that 'tis no easy matter to get near enough to them even to shoot them -- &
21st. very few in comparison of the great numbers there are, were shot
during our stay at New Holland. As there is a most exact print of this uncommon Animal in Capt. Cook's Acct. of this Country I shall not take the trouble to discribe it.

Extract from, A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, 1787-1789, Manuscript page 4
Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon
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Digital ID: 
a1085082
About this item: 

Arthur Bowes-Smyth, illustrated journal, 1787-1789. Titled `A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, Merchantman William Cropton Sever, Commander by Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon - 1787-1788-1789'; being a fair copy compiled ca 1790.

Transcript: 

[Page 84]

consist of a very short Vocabulary; they Description seem'd surpris'd at the Sight of the Ships. I presented many of them of New wt. Glass Beads & several Gentlemen put Ribbands & Glass Trincketts Holland abt. their heads but they seemed altogether a most stupid insensible Continued set of beings -- they seem'd most desirous of Hats from their attempting to seize the Hats of many persons on shore.
They seemed to express a Wish to know of what Sex we were & several of the persons onshore satisfied them in that particular. -- When they found we were men like themselves they express'd their joy & astonishment by loud Exclamations & grotesque gestures, & immediately shook hands with us. Their Huts or Wigwams are dispersed abt. & cat paths leading from one to the other.
Having wandered some distance into the woods in search of Insects & other natural Curiosities, I lost myself & cd. not find my way back to the Wooding Party, which threw me into no small panic least I shd. meet with any of the Natives before I cd. extricate myself from the Labarynth I had got into. At one time I was surrounded by fern (exactly the same as in England) on every side above my head. And in this awkward situation I came very near Wigwams or Hut in which I heard the voices of Men & Women, I was apprehensive I shd. be seen by them; but, I crawl'd along gently & had the good Luck to escape being noticed by them; &: to my inexpressable Joy I shortly after got sight of the Bay; I bent my course towards it & upon clearing the wood I found myself upon a point of Rock at least a mile from the Guard & Wooding party -- I directed my course along shore till I reached the Party & in my way there I fell in with a Canoe

Extract from, A Journal of a Voyage from Portsmouth to New South Wales and China in the Lady Penrhyn, 1787-1789, Manuscript page 6
Arthur Bowes-Smyth, Surgeon
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Digital ID: 
a1085085

 William Bradley (1757?-1833)

William Bradley sailed with the First Fleet in May 1787 following his appointment to First Lieutenant on board HMS Sirius in October 1786. After arriving at Port Jackson on 26 January 1788, he was immediately deployed to assist Captain John Hunter on a series of surveys of Sydney Harbour. Bradleys Point on the northern harbour shore was named for him.

In October 1788 Bradley sailed with the Sirius to the Cape of Good Hope for supplies, returning to Port Jackson in May 1789. In March 1790 he again sailed with the Sirius to Norfolk Island where the ship foundered on the rocks and was lost. Bradley was forced to remain on the island for 11 months before being picked up by the Supply.

In March 1791 Bradley returned to England on board the Waaksamheid. In England he was one of several officers court martialled over the loss of the Sirius. All were honourably acquitted. At Governor Phillip's request, Bradley was promoted to the rank of Master and Commander, in July 1792. He rose to the rank of Rear Admiral of the Blue and was superannuated in September 1812.

Bradley's journal was unknown until 1923, a year before it was acquired by Mitchell Library from a London bookseller. Bradley's is a more formal record than an intimate diary. With 29 watercolours inserted between the journal's pages, it appears to have been prepared for publication.

About this item: 

William Bradley - Journal. Titled `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ This journal was probably compiled some years after the events it records. It seems to be a fair copy compiled after 1802. Page 48 bears a watermark for the year 1802.
 

Transcript: 

[Page 55]
1788
January.
Thunder & Light'ning & blew strong some hours from the W.tward
Thursday. 10th. The weather clear'd up with a fine breeze at W.t we had a very heavy cross swell: AM The weather very squally & unsettled, wind frequently shifting, NNW & WSW: Latitude at Noon 43º:38'S.o Longitude 149º:31' E.t
11th. At 1/2 p 7 PM. The wind shifted in a very heavy squall in which the Golden Grove split her Top sails & the P.re of Wales carried away her Mainyard; this Squall was violent & came on with remarkable loud Thunder & strong light'ning w very heavy rain, it lasted half an hour, the weather then became clear w a moderate breeze of wind from NW to SW, at 7 AM It suddenly came on to blow strong & near Noon was mod.t & clear settled weather again. Lat.d 42º:19'S.o..130º27'E.t
Saturday. 12th. PM Mod.t & clear weather, at 11 it was Calm & in less than 1/2 an hour, it suddenly blew strong from the SW with severe light'ning. AM near Noon it fell little wind with fine serene clear weather. Lat.d 41º:17'S.o..150º:43'E.t
Sunday. 13th. The wind coming to the W.t & N.o obliged us to stand off to the E.tward, the weather moderate till 10 PM then Blowing hard & very squally from the NW. AM Continued to blow strong with frequent Squalls. Lat.d 40º:00'S.o Long. 151º:22' E.t
Monday. 14th:PM at 4 It became moderate the wind shifted to SW with clear weather. AM Light Breezes & clear weather at Noon Latitude 38º:10'.S. Longitude 151º:09' E.t

Extract from journal titled, `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ manuscript, page 1
William Bradley
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Digital ID: 
a138055
About this item: 

William Bradley - Journal. Titled `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ This journal was probably compiled some years after the events it records. It seems to be a fair copy compiled after 1802. Page 48 bears a watermark for the year 1802.

Transcript: 

[Page 56]
1788
January.
Tuesday.15: Clear weather. At 1 PM. Had several good Observations of the [sun] and [moon] the mean of which gave 152º:48'E. & of those taken by Capn Hunter 152º:44'E.t which was 11/2º degree to the E.tward of account since leaving Van Diemans Land We suppose this occasioned by a strong set from between the Schouten Islands & Pt Hicks from which we had a great Sea & think it probable that there may be either a streight or a deep Gulf: Wind NE & N.o Latitude 37º:39'S.o Long.e 151º:47'E.t
Wednesday. 16th: Hazey weather with a fresh Gale at N.o with which we stood off & on the shore endeavoring to preserve a moderate distance from the shore, not thinking it safe to go near with the Convoy 'till well to the N.oward. AM. Fair weather w. a moderate breeze at NNW. 37º:39'S.o 151º:29'E.t at Noon
Thursday. 17th: Light variable winds & calm with frequent heavy rains Thunder & Light'ning: At Noon Clear W.r with variable light airs. 37º:19'S.o 151º:45'E.t [a]
Friday. 18th: PM. at 6. A breeze sprung up from SE. AM. At 8 hauled in to endeavor to make the land before night. 35º:48'S.o..151º:36'E
Saturday. 19th. Fresh Breezes from the SE at 7. PM. Brot too, not having made the Land. AM. Mod.t & clear at day light saw the Land bearing WbN, at 10. were abreast of some remarkable white sand hills, having much the appearance of white cliffs At Noon, were in 34º:30'.S.o Saw red point (so named by Capn Cook) with a small Island on with it W1/2N 4 leagues, the round

Extract from journal titled, `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ manuscript, page 2
William Bradley
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Digital ID: 
a138056
About this item: 

William Bradley - Journal. Titled `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ This journal was probably compiled some years after the events it records. It seems to be a fair copy compiled after 1802. Page 48 bears a watermark for the year 1802.

Transcript: 

[Page 57]
1788.
January.
Hill mention'd by Cap.n Cook as like the crown of a Hat bore WbN, the N.oern extreme of land N.o 10 leag.s a very remarkable clump of Trees like those on Portsdown were seen at Noon NbW... Red point may very readily be known by Capn Cooks remarks viz. the round hill a little to the N.owd of it; but it is necessary to observe that there are two Islands near it & that the Land to the N.oward of the red land forming the point, is very white.
Sunday. 20th: At 2 PM. Saw the white cliffs mention'd by Cap.n Cook to be 10 miles to the S.oward of Botany Bay; I do not altogether think it a certain mark for knowing when you are near Botany Bay, there being many white Sand Hills that shew like Cliffs coming up the Coast; the land from these White Cliffs to the N.oward is tolerably even.
At 4. Saw the entrance of Botany Bay, appearing in the middle of land that shew'd like an Island lying a small distance from the shore, We saw the neck of land by which it is joined to the other land when 8 or 9 miles to the S.oward of the entrance of Botany Bay, it has a sandy beach, the shore cover'd with wood, in the sandy beach is the appearance of a Gully or opening.
The land about the entrance of Botany Bay appears in hummocks & Rocky; & with a Glass pt Solander, the S.o point of the Bay may be seen like a perpendicular notch cut in the rocks near the middle of the land, like an Island.

Extract from journal titled, `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ manuscript, page 3
William Bradley
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Digital ID: 
a138057
About this item: 

William Bradley - Journal. Titled `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ This journal was probably compiled some years after the events it records. It seems to be a fair copy compiled after 1802. Page 48 bears a watermark for the year 1802.

Transcript: 

[Page 58]
1788
January.
Those cliffs 10 miles to the S.oward of Botany Bay make in 5 cliffs as you come near abreast of them & the Portsdown clump of Trees is on the N.omost of them when bearing W.t soon after which, that clump loses its remarkable appearance.
At Sun Set, the entrance of Botany Bay bore N.19ºW 7 or 8 Mile shorten'd Sail & made the Signal for the Convoy to pass in succession within hail, they were order'd to be very attentive during the night & to keep their Stations strictly when we made sail in the morning: AM. At day light made sail for the Bay with a mod.t breeze at SE & when within about 2 miles of the S.o Head saw the Supply in the Bay & soon after the 3 Transports that had been dispatch'd under the Command of the Agent.
The Master of the Supply came on board as we approach'd the entrance, He informed us that they had only been arrived two days & the Agent one day before us & the heavy ships; at 8. Anchored with the Convoy in Botany Bay & moored immediately.
                p.t Solander SSE }
                Cape Banks ESE} in 8 f.m water.
We found that the Governor had without much difficulty met some of the Natives on the N.o side of the Bay & after convincing them of his good intentions, they receiv'd some trifling presents from him which they handed to each other without much concern. They were quite naked & had 

Extract from journal titled, `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ manuscript, page 4
William Bradley
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Digital ID: 
a138058
About this item: 

William Bradley - Journal. Titled `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ This journal was probably compiled some years after the events it records. It seems to be a fair copy compiled after 1802. Page 48 bears a watermark for the year 1802.

Transcript: 

[Page 59]
1788.
January.
much the appearance of being well disposed toward us. We saw 8 of them setting on the rocks as we came into the Bay, they called to us, some of them walked along the Shore & others kept setting on the rocks: The Boats met with Natives in every part of the Bay but no women had yet been seen.
Captain Hunter went on board the Supply to the Governor & with him visited the South Shore taking a Guard of Marines with them. Near the place the Governor landed at, we saw several of the Natives in small parties of two, three & five together, frequently advancing & again retreating; The Governor advanced by himself & laid down some presents for them then retired, one of the Natives immediately advanced, picked it up & handed it to the others apparently pleas'd, by Noon we saw that our People & the Natives were mixed together, the Boat Crews amused themselves with dressing the Natives w paper & other whimsical things to entertain them, with which they were pleas'd for the moment.
Monday. 21. PM. An Officer & party of Men were sent from the Sirius to clear away to a run of water on the S.o side of the Bay: The Natives were well pleas'd with our People until they began clearing the Ground at which they were displeased & wanted them to be gone; At sun set when the Boats left the shore, several of the Natives came down to the water side & then went to their Huts. Mr King returned

Extract from journal titled, `A Voyage to New South Wales', December 1786 - May 1792; compiled 1802+ manuscript, page 5
William Bradley
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Digital ID: 
a138059

 Ralph Clark (1755? - 1794)

Promoted First Lieutenant in February 1789 in New South Wales, Ralph Clark had undertaken the voyage to New South Wales in the hope of gaining promotion. During the voyage he was attached to the Friendship, one of the convict transports for female prisoners.

Clark’s journal is a particularly personal account of the First Fleet, filled with his dreams, fears, homesickness and his longing for his wife, Betsey Alicia, and their young son. The facts of Clark’s life are few and elusive. We know his birthday – 30 March – because he mentions it in his diary, but we do not know the precise year of his birth though it was around 1755. While in New South Wales, Clark formed a relationship with a convict woman, Mary Branham, with whom he had an illegitimate daughter born in 1791.

Clark Island in Sydney Harbour was named for him. While in New South Wales he was known for his empathy with the local indigenous people.

He returned to England in 1792 on the Gorgon. By the end of 1794, the Clark family was dead. Betsey Alicia died giving birth to a stillborn child. Clark was fatally wounded in service at a French outpost on 18 June. His nine year old son, serving as a volunteer on the same ship as his father, died of yellow fever on 29 June.

Betsey's family preserved Clark's journal until 1914 when it was acquired by the Library.

About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

Transcript: 

(26-27 January 1788)

against use - the Prince of Wales and us got foul of each other they carried away our Jibb Boom but what dammadge we did her I cannot Say as I did not lick it I was affraid that we would both have being driven on Shore as the blow fresh - Soon after the Charlotte ran foul of use and Shooke use very much - I was more frightend than I was When the prince of Wales was foul of use - if it had not being by the greatest good luck we Should have been both on Shore on the rocks and the Ships must must have been all lost and the greater part if not the whole on board drownd for we Should have gone to pices in less than a half of an hour but how good the Almighty is to use - I return him my most Sincer prayers for his Kindness to use - thank god we have got clear out as hav all the Ships and hope to be in the course of a few hours at Port Jackson as it is a fine fair Breeze - as we run along the Shore Saw a great number of firess and a few Natives - blessed be to God that we have got Save to ane Anchor in one of the finest harbours in the world - I never Saw any like it - the River Thames is not to be mentioned to it and that I thought was the finest in the world - this Said port Jackson is the most beautiful place - I cannot compair any think to come nearer to it than about 3 miles above Saltash to the Wair - here we make the Ships fast to the Trees on Shore both sides of Governours Cove - we are about 5 miles from the entrance - found all the Ships here at anchor -

Sunday 27 Kist your dear Pictour as Usual on this day and read the lessons for the day - order came on board for which See the orderly Book - my dear wife - Sent the men beloning to Capt. Tench Company on board the Charlotte to be landed from ther - dinned by myself all the rest dinned out - I am Quite charmed with the place - oh that if you was only here and our dear Boy my Alicia I Should not wish to come home if the place agreed with our health but without you I would not Stay if it was the best place under the face of heaven no that I would not my dear Beloved wife for without you I cannot live. The Tents look a prety amonst the Trees - I hope to be on Shore to morrow if Please good 

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 1
Ralph Clark
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Digital ID: 
a262119
About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

Transcript: 

[Page 2] (15 February 1790)

Munday 15 the[y] made me to understand that there were no women there I then asked them to goe and bring me down the [blank] which is their name for child Dourrawan went and brought a Boy a bout 3 Years old on his Shoulder the child was as much frightend at use as Davis was at them I then desired Tirriwan to goe and bring me down one of his children as Dourrawan informd me that he was the father of the Child he had brought down and that his woman the mother of his child was (poc) dead of the (mittayon) Small Pox Tirriwan brought also down a Boy much a bout the same age as the other Tirriwan child was not quite Recoverd from the Small Pox I asked him for his (din) he Said that She was up in the wood given a Young child the (nipan) the Breast I gave each of the children a bit of Red cloath I asked them if the[y] would give me the children for my hatt which the[y] Seemd to wish most for but the[y] would not on any account part with there children which I liked them for the Governour has often asked me as the Natives Seemd not So much affraid of me as the[y] are of every body else to take one of them and bring them in Yesterday and to day I might with great ease and without running anydanger have taken these two men but as I told Ellis when he asked me if I did not intend to take them I told him that it would be very Ungenerous to ...

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 2
Ralph Clark
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Digital ID: 
a262136
About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

 

Transcript: 

[Page 3] (17 February 1790)

Wednesday 17 he then Said I am going I said it is impossible he Said it was very true and that there was two of the Companies to goe with him if So I shall be very happy to goe with you or Captain Campble he Said that he was much obliged to me and Should be very happy for me to goe with him he Said that he would not take Captain Campbles companies with him he Should leave him to take the command and care of the Remainder of the detachment that would be left behind You will not mention it to any body as I have not told it to any person except Capt. Campble and Your Self he Said I shall take Meridiths and Johnstones Companies with me and I am thinking of taking Lieuts Shearp, Faddy, Ross and yourself and Creswell who is ther already for I will not take any of them that was in that Court Martial nor Shall I take Meridith with me I would much reather that Some person else was going than Shearp for I doe not like him in Short he is a man that I detest from the bottom of my Soul what can be the Reason of this Great Removal it was only a few days Since that the Governour informed use that he intended to Send the Sirius to China for Provisions if there was no Ships arrived befor the 3 of next month I hope in God that Some Ship or Ships will arrive before our going to Norfolk

Cloudy Weather after I was Releved from Guard I went down to my Island to look at my Garden and found that Some Boat had landed Since I had been there last and taken away the Greatest part of a fine Bed of Onions it is impossible for any body to attemp to raise any Gardin Stuff for before it comes to perfection the[y] will Steal it I thought that having a Garden on an island it would be more Secure but I find that they even get at it my corn comes on

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 3
Ralph Clark
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Digital ID: 
a262139
About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

Transcript: 

[Page 4] (18-19 February 1790)

Thursday 18 as well as corn can doe I have that they will be so good as to let that Remain but I am much affraid that the[y] will not Returnd to dinner at Majr. Ross's who Said I forgot yesterday when I mentioned Shearp that You and him were not on good terms for which Reason I Shall not take him with me but will askd J. Johnstone which he did in the Evening who Said that he Should be very happy to goe with him —

Friday 19 Cloudy weather after Breackfast went up the harbour in my Boat and took the Skull with me and landed at the place where I found it I collected the rest of the bons and made a grave and depositd them in it and got a Stone placed at the Head without any monumental inscription to denote to any person that may be Ranging this way whose Remains are interred under the Stone all the flesh was not quite decayed particular about upper part of the thigh as the place where I found the Skeleton and where I Buried it is a point of land in Lane Cove I have named it Skeleton point intended to have Returnd to dinner at Majr. Ross's but the day turning out very fine I went father up the Cove and collected Sweet Tea to carry with me to Norfolk Returnd home a little before Sun Sett Shot a few Paroquet Lieut Kellow came to my house Soon after my Return and Said that he would be glad to Speak a few words with me he Said that I was not a Stranger to the disagreable Situation that he has been laboring under for these 15 months past and I hope that you will not have any objections as I have asked Several of my Brother officers and who Say that the[y] have knon that of my going home Sick provisg Majr. Ross will give his consent and gives up the letter which you wrote to him in consequence of the late Captain Sheas representation 

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 4
Ralph Clark
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a262140
About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

Transcript: 

[Page 5] (19-20 March 1790)

Stay the[y] wore her which She did only a few Yards from the Rock from there been obliged to wair, it only brought them So much the nearer the Shore the[y] could not Stand long this Way on account of the Reef which runs a long the Shore about 12 oClock the[y] Endevoured to put her about but She would not Stay She got in the trof of the Sea which forst her Stern formost on the Reef as the Bell rung 12 oClock She Struck when the[y] found that She Struck the[y] Cut a way all her mast gracious god what will become of use all, the whole of our Provision in the Ship now a Wreck before use I hope in god that we will be able to Save Some if not all but why doe I flatter myself with Such hopes there is at present no prospect of it except that of Starving what will become of the people that are on board for no boat can goe along Side for the Sea and her am I who has nothing more than what I stand in and not the Smales hope of my getting anything out of the Ship for every body expects that She will goe to pices when the tide comes in Soon after the Ship Struck Major Ross proclaimd Martial Law for which See the orderly Book and the Remainder of what followd in the day for I am So low that I cannot hold the pincle to write in short my pocket Book is foul and will not hold any more

Saterday 20 have been up all night as has every body in the place Soon after the Ship went on Shore trunks, Boxs beds &c what was nearest at hand was thrown over board in hopes it would float on Shore a great dele has come on Shore but as Yet nothing of mine Captain Hunter and between 30 and 40 of the people came on Shore on a graiting made fast to hauzher and the Remainder are coming on Shore as fast as the[y] can as Yet there is nobody drownd or lost I was very near

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 5
Ralph Clark
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a262154
About this item: 

Ralph Clark - Journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island; and on the Gorgon returning to England, 9 March 1787 - 31 December 1787, 1 January 1788 - 10 March 1788, 15 February 1790 - 2 January 1791, 25 January 1791 - 17 June 1792.

Transcript: 

[Page 6] (24-27 December 1790)

Decr 1790 Friday 24th Squally wind west it Raind very hard in the night not much Surf on the Reef Sent the Boat out for Gannets and a fishing She Returnd about ½ after Eight with only 4 Snappers there was too much Surf Round Nepean Island for the Boat to Land with Safety for to get Birds and it Blowd too hard for them to fish after Breakfast Majr. Ross, John and Self walked out to Charlotte Field to See what progress I have made Since his last being there he told me that he is very much pleasd with what I have done in the manner I have planed and Built the Houses.

Saterday 25th Fine weather but blows fresh from the Southward and a great Sea Rolling into the Bay which will make a great Surf on the Reef on which there is a great dele at present this being Christmas day I wish a merry merry Christmas to all the world the most poorest person in England will be better off this day than any of use here for the[y] will be able to get Small bier with their dinner to drink if nothing better and there is not any of use will have anything better but cool water this will be a dry Christmas doe good Gorgon come and take use away from this place.

Sunday 26th Fine weather little wind but a great Surf on the Reef I wish to god the Gorgon would arrive every day is an age I am affraid Some Accidenthas happend to her Touso who left his work on the 20 Inst at Charlotte for my telling him that I would flog him for being impertinent to Mr. Dodge gave himself up last night to Mr. Hume at Cascade from whence he was brought last night and put in Irons.

Munday 27th Fine weather Blows fresh in the offening wind a Southing by west a good dele of Surf on the Reef walked out to Charlotte Field at day break Staid untill Sun Set Majr. Ross Sent out Touso to be Punished which he was and Received 100 Lashes and to work in Irons on the Road untill further orders  

Extract from journal kept on the Friendship during a voyage to Botany Bay and Norfolk Island…, 26 January 1788, Manuscript, page 6
Ralph Clark
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a262222

 John Easty 

Neither his birth nor death dates of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough, are known. Arriving with the First Fleet on board the Scarborough, Easty returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales.

Easty’s simple, direct diary reads like a list of events and occurrences. His is a forthright, unpretentious account in tortured English, recording the occasions both he and other marines were disciplined for various offences.

Easty's journal was acquired by Sir William Dixson and bequeathed to the Dixson Library in 1952.

About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

Extract from A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay ..., November 1786 - May 1793, by John Easty View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1145001
Transcript: 

Partial transcription (26-28 January 1788)

att 2 oclock Cleard Cape Bank Steard NNE all along Shore the Shore Seems to all together rocky near the water att 6 att night Entered the mouth of Port Jackson itt is a very Copleat harbour we Saw a great many of the nativs as we Came in att 1/2 Past 7 Came to anchore oppisite a littel Cove now nameed Philips Cove Sidney Cove

Sunday Jan'y the 27th 1788

Cleare weather this morning 100 Convicts went on shore att 2 oclock Captn Lt Tench Disembarkd from the Ships with his Compan

Munday Jarfv the 28th 1788 Cleare weather this Morning the remaindur of the Convicts Disimbarked att 10 oclock the Detachment of marines Disembarked Piched our tents on Shore

Extract from A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay ..., November 1786 - May 1793, by John Easty View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1145094
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

head Quarters Tuesday

Janry the 29th 1788
Cleare weather victeld by the Commasary the Convicts
implyed in Clearing the Land this night Corp1 goodall reduced
to Private by order of major Ross

Munday Febry the 4th 1788
Cleare weather all day att
night very heavey Tempest
with Thunder and Lightening
att 1/2 Past 8 att night a flash of Lightening as Struck a Tree
So as to Split itt down in the middle no other dammage viry
rain

Wedansday Febry the 6th 1788 Cleare weather all day att night
very heavy Thunder and Lighening as ever I Saw this night a
tree Split and 6 Sheep and 2 Lambs killed

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145095
View collection item detail
Transcript: 

Friday Feb the 15th 1788
this morning the Sentanced of
the Court held yesturday put
into Excution 2 Wemen recievd
25 Lashes Each for theft att the Carts tail and one man 45 for 
theft att the Carts taill

Wedansday Febrv the 27 1788 this day the Crimenall Cortt adjurnd Cast for Death 3 men Thos Barret Excuted this Evning the others repreved Henry Lowel & Jas Hall to be Banished of the Hand for Life on a Desolate Hand

Sattaday March the 8th 1788
this Night about 1/2 past 8 oclock I was Confined by Serjt Hume for bringing a feameale Convict into Camp

Extract from A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay ..., November 1786 - May 1793, by John Easty View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1145098
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Munday March the 10th 1788 this day Jno Easty Jno Calaytan
tryed by a court Martiall

Thuraday Wedensday March the 12th 1788
this day Peter Dargan tryed
for a breach of Trust this night att 5 oclock Easty & Cayton
recieved 150 Lachess Each & Dargan 100

M Tuesday March the 18th 1788
This day Jophef Hunt a marine Tryed by a court Martiall for
Strikeing another marine the Court Satt 4 times when Major
Ross would not Except of the Courtmartiall upon wich the
Court Confined them Selfs Captn Lt Tench lst Lt Kellow 1st Lt
Poulden 1st Lt Davey 1st Lt Timmins and Said that thay would
go home to England

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145099
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Friday March the 6th 1789
this Day as a party of Convicts ware going to Botaney Bay the
Natives attackted them in a great Number and killid one of
them and Wounded Sevaral others in a Daingourous manner
and them which Came home whare Confined and Punishd with
one Hundred and fifty Lashes Each

Wedensday March the 18 1789
this Day a key was found Broke in one of the Locks att the
Publick Store house for Which Joseph Hunt a marine was
confined who was after taking as the kings Evidince and
impeeched upon Luke Hines Richd asque James Baker James
Brown Richd Dukes and Thos Jones Privt Marines who had
been with him in Robing the Store house

Wedensday Thursday March the 25th & 26th1789
this Dai Luke Hines James Baker James Brown Richd asque
Richt Dukes and Thos Jones Marines was tryed by A Criminall
Cort for Robing the

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145110
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Storehouse when on the 26 about
1/2 Past 2 oclock thay all Recd Sentanced
of Death and the Galleows was Erected
before the Sentance was Cast upon them

Friday March the 27th 1789
this Day att 10 oclock Luke Hines James Baker James Brown
Richt Asque Richt1 Dukes and Thos Jones was Excuted between
the 2 Store housees when thay all Said that Joseph hunt was the
ocation of all thier Deaths as he was the first that bagan the
Said Roberry but he Recd a free Pardon thare was hardley a
marine
Present but what Shed tears offacers and men

Wedensday April the 1st 1789
this Day Wm Wall a marin Departed this Life after a Long
Lingering illness and was Buried in Miliertry form

Thursday April the 30th 1789
this Day about one oclock in the after noon Edward odges
Michell Towlien Marines which belonged to Rose hill and was
doing Duty thare went out a Shoting and was Lost in the
Woods and wear heard of Since although Search was made for
3 or 4 Days after them

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145111
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Friday Feberary the 19th 1790
this Day Major Ross was orderd to hold him Self in readynes to
Embark on bord his M:S Sirous and Supply with 2 Companys
on the 5th of March Next for Norfolk Hand

Munday Febriary the 22d 1790
this Day Thos Brimage Privt in the
53d and Jn° Easty Signed and
Sealed thiaer Last Wills and testaments to each other
 Febry 24 dePartd this
Life Wm Edmonston

Wedensday March the 3d 1790
this Day Major Ross with Captn Lieut G Jonstone first Lieuts
Kellow J Jonston and Clarke and 2d Lieut faddy and Ross with
3 Serjts 4 Corpls 3 Drums and 46 Privts Embarked on bord the
Sirous and Supply to Join first Lieu1 Creswel and 1 Serjt and 14
Privt now Doing Duty att Norfolk

Sattaday March the 6th
 this Day the Sirows and Supply Sailed for Norfolk Hand

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145114
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Wedensday March the 31 1790
this Day Richd Knight a marine was
tryed by a Criminal Cort for Robing a
Gardean for which he was Sintancd 200 Lashes

Munday April the 5th 1790
this Day the Supply arived from Norfolk Hand and gave an ac
count of the Sirous being Cast away upon the Hand of Norfolk
on march the 19th Last but all hands and Stores Savid

Sattaday April the 17th 1790
this Day His Majistys Armd tender Supply Brig Saild from this
Port for Norfolk and Batavie for Provisions for the Settelment

Tuesday April the 20th 1790
this Day Wm Chafe a Convict was Executed for House Roberry

Munday May the 3d 1790
this Day Wm Dowland a marine Departed this Life of a flux
and fever att Rose Hill

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145115
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

Sunday this July 25 1790 this Day the Lady Jula anne Saild
from this place for Norfolk and China and from there to
England

Wedensday 28 this Day the Justinnia
Saild for the above places

Sunday August 1st
this day the Suprise Transport Saild from this place with 150
Women and 30 men convicts
 for Norfolk Hand and to proceed from that to England by
Chinea

Sunday august the 8th
this day the Scarborough Trans port Saild from this on her way
to England by China Salluted the place with 7 Guns the first
Ship as Ever Salluted this place Sent a litter home by her

Tuesday the 24
this day the Nipturne Saild from this place for England by
China a Criminal Court held on Hugh Low a convict for Sheep
Steeling brought in Guilty of Death

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145118
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

August the 25th 1790
this day att 12 oclock Hugh Low
was Excuted according to his Sentanc
pased on him yesterday

Sepbr the 6th
this day Patrick McQuen a marine Departed this Life and
buried in A milliantary form

Sep the 7th
this day His Excellency Arthur Philip Governer of New S
Wailes was wounded by the Nativs in the Shoulder but not
mortall

October the 4th 1790
this day James McManis a marine was tryed by a criminal
court for house Breaking But was acquited

Tuesday October the 19th 1790
This day arived His Majestys armd tender Supply from
Batavey with Stores and Provisions for the Settelment

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145119
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

nd on Sunday the 27 att day Light She waid anchor and ran
down the harbour She was again Cheard by the marines which
was returnd by the Ships Company and thar was two partys of
men Saparated which had Spent 4 years together in the
greatest Love and frindship as Ever men did in Such a distant
part of the globe . . . Both by officeers and men She was than
accompanyed down the harbour by the Governer and all the
Marine officers which when thay parted She Saluted them
with 9 Guns which was the Last Honour as Could be Confirrd
on them and on Mundaay att 6 in
the Morning She went to Sea and
may god Send them a good voige I Pray
on the munday night of the 28 8 men with
1 woman and 2 Chrildren Convicts toke a kings boat of 6 oars
with a large quantity of Provisions which thay had got from
time

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145126
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Little is known of John Easty, private marine on the Scarborough. Neither his birth nor death dates are known. He returned to England in December 1792, on the Atlantic, the same ship that conveyed Arthur Phillip home. In September 1794 he was employed by a London grocer and spent some years petitioning the Admiralty for compensation promised for short rations in New South Wales. 

References:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

to time by work and a new Scene for fishing with a large
quantuty of Carpinters tools of all Sorts for Enlargeing the
Boat with beds and Mathackmattick instruments and Cumpus
New Sails and Masts and oars and 6 stand of Arms and Evrey
thing that was nesarry for Making thare Escape which was
Excuted betwen the hours of 9 and 12 it was Supposed that
thay intended for Bativee but having no vessell in the harbour
thare was no Persueing them so thayd got
Clear of but its a very Desparate attempt to go in an open Boat
for a run of about 16 or 17 hundred Leags and in pertucalar for
a woman and 2 Small Children the oldest not above 3 years of
age but the thoughts of Liberty from Such a place as this is
Enoufh to induce any Convicts to try all Skeemes to obtain it
as thay are the Same as Slaves all the time thay are in this
Country allthough thare times
are Expired for which thay are sentanced
by Law thare is no difference between them and a Convict that
is jest Cast for transportation

Collection 04: John Easty - Journal, 1786-1793. Titled `Pt Jno Easty A Memorandum of the Transa[ ] of a Voiage [sic] from England to Botany Bay in The Scarborough transport Captn Marshall Commander kept by me your humble Servan[ ] John Easty marine wich [
November 1786 - May 1793
Easty, John
Digital ID: 
a1145127
View collection item detail

 Philip Gidley King (1758-1808)

Philip Gidley King’s journal is contained in two volumes. It covers the voyage to New South Wales, the voyage to Norfolk Island and events there, a vocabulary of 'The New Zealanders language', and an account of a voyage from Norfolk Island to New Zealand. King’s journal was published in part, with the journal of John Hunter, in 1793.

King also kept a copy of this journal in a single volume and with additional information. This copy is also held in the Library’s collections.

In February 1788, shortly after arriving in Sydney Cove, Philip Gidley King sailed for Norfolk Island under orders to found a settlement there. On 6 March 1788 King formally took possession of Norfolk Island in the name of King George III.

While on Norfolk Island, King formed a relationship with Ann Inett, a convict woman. They had two sons, Norfolk and Sydney. Both boys were educated in England, and like Phillip Parker King, his legitimate son, became officers in the Royal Navy.

King was appointed third Governor of New South Wales in 1799 taking over from Hunter in September 1800.

King's journal was acquired from the King family in 1933.

Collection 06 vol. 1: Philip Gidley King - Private journal, in two volumes, 1786-1792. Vol. 1 titled: `Remarks & Journal kept on the Expedition to form a Colony in His Majestys Territory of New South Wales ...is Majesty's Ship Sirius ...', 24 October 1786
24 October 1786 - 12 January 1789
King, Philip Gidley, 1758-1808
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1296250
Transcript: 

[Page 2]

Remarks & Journal
kept on the Expedition
to form a Colony in His Majestys
Territory of New South Wales
Under the Command of
His Excellency Arthur Phillip Esqr
His Majestys Governor & Captain general
0f ye said Territory & its dependancies
Kept by
Lieutenant Philip Gidley King
Second Lieutenant of His Majesty’s Ship
Sirius.
Emplyed on ye above Expedition

Collection 06 vol. 1: Philip Gidley King - Private journal, in two volumes, 1786-1792. Vol. 1 titled: `Remarks & Journal kept on the Expedition to form a Colony in His Majestys Territory of New South Wales ...is Majesty's Ship Sirius ...', 24 October 1786 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1296002
Transcript: 

[Page 3]

As I write this Journal for my own satisfaction, I do beg & request, that, into whatever hands it may fall, (in case of any accidents happening to me) To give or forward it into the hands of His Excellency Governor Phillip, or in case of his demise, to Lieut. William Dawes of the Marines, who I instruct to destroy it; if any of the materials can be of service to the latter he is perfectly welcome to them —

Philip Gidley King

Collection 06 vol. 1: Philip Gidley King - Private journal, in two volumes, 1786-1792. Vol. 1 titled: `Remarks & Journal kept on the Expedition to form a Colony in His Majestys Territory of New South Wales ...is Majesty's Ship Sirius ...', 24 October 1786 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1296003
Transcript: 

[Page 4]

His Majestys Ship Sirius of 20 Guns 612 Tons & 160 Men for which Ship I received my Commission as second Lieutenant, was commissioned ye 24th of October 1786 & ordered to be fitted out with the greatest despatch, as it was presumed that she would proceed on ye Service for which she was destined, early in December, Captain Arthur Phillip was appointed to the chief command of her as 1st Captain & Capt Jn° Hunter was promoted from Master & Commander to ye Rank of Post Captain, by an order of His Majesty in Council & acted as second Captain. The first Captain who has likewise a Commission under ye Great Seal of Great Britain as Captain General & Governor of His Majesties Territory of New South Wales; (extending from ye 44th degree of South Lattitude to the 10 Degree of South Lattitude & from ye 135° of East Longitude to Ed. The Islands thereon dependant), he is supposed at all times to command ye Ship & when he thinks it expedient for the publick service is at llberty to embark onboard her. The other officers & names are expressed in the beg

Collection 06 vol. 1: Philip Gidley King - Private journal, in two volumes, 1786-1792. Vol. 1 titled: `Remarks & Journal kept on the Expedition to form a Colony in His Majestys Territory of New South Wales ...is Majesty's Ship Sirius ...', 24 October 1786 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1296004
Collection 06 vol. 1: Philip Gidley King - Private journal, in two volumes, 1786-1792. Vol. 1 titled: `Remarks & Journal kept on the Expedition to form a Colony in His Majestys Territory of New South Wales ...is Majesty's Ship Sirius ...', 24 October 1786
24 October 1786 - 12 January 1789
King, Philip Gidley, 1758-1808
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1296251


 John Hunter (1737 - 1821)

John Hunter sailed with the First Fleet as second captain on board HMS Sirius. Once at Port Jackson, Hunter undertook surveys in the harbour and around the coast. He records in his journal his surprise at the size of the indigenous population which belied the notion of terra nullius.

In October 1788, the Sirius, under Hunter’s command, returned to the Cape of Good Hope to buy emergency supplies for the colony. They arrived back at Sydney Cove in May 1789. 

Hunter returned to England on the Waaksamheid in March 1791. In England he was court martialled for the loss of the Sirius, at Norfolk Island in March 1790, and honourably acquitted. In February 1795 he was appointed Governor of New South Wales to succeed Phillip though he did not return to the colony to take up his new position until September.

Hunter’s journal was published in 1793. His manuscript journal was bequeathed to the Library by Sir William Dixson in 1952. 

Extract from journal John Hunter kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791:

Collection 05: John Hunter - journal kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791
Digital ID: 
a1518001
View collection item detail
Collection 05: John Hunter - journal kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791
Digital ID: 
a1518002
View collection item detail
Transcript: 

(1)
On the 25th: of October 1786 His Majesties Ship Sirius was Commission’d, & the Command given to Cap’n Arthur Phillip, the Supply Arm’d Tender was also Commiss’d & Lieut Henry Sidgbird Ball appointed to Command her --
It being the intention of Government at this time, to remove so great a Nuisance & inconvenience as the Country at present Sufford from the Goals being so exceedingly Crouded with Criminals who had been by the Laws Condemn’d to Transportation; the East coast of New Holland was the place determind, upon which to form a Settlement for this Salutary purpose; and the above Ships were intended as an Escort to the Transports which were to Convey the Convicts to that Country, and which were at this time fitting & in Considerable forewardnes for that Service. The East Coast of New Holland is that Country which was discover’d and Explor’d by Captain James Cook in his first Voyage round the World, and by him Calld New South Wales, Botany Bay the only place he enterd with the Ship which coud be Calld a Harbor, having been mention’d in the Narrative of that Voyage, as a Convenient place for a Settlement, Government fixd upon that place for the intended purpose.
The Sirius is a Ship of about 540 Tons exceedingly well Calculated for such a Service, she Mounts 20 Guns & has [indecipherable] over them, of a round full Built & is altogether a very capacious

Collection 05: John Hunter - journal kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1518003
Transcript: 

(2-3)
Capacious & Convenient Vessel. The Supply Armd Tender is a Brig, & was one of those Vessels which are Employ’d in Carrying Naval Stores from one of His Majesties Dockyards to another; she is a very firm Strong little Vessel, very flat floord & Capacious Mounts 8 Guns & has a deep Waist, which I fear will be found a very great, if not a dangerous inconvenience in so low a Vessel upon so long a Voyage. These two Ships were intended, after having performd the Service of Escorting the Convicts to the place of their destination, to remain there to be Employ’d as the Governor might find necessary for the Public Service untill relievd by other Ships from England --
I had some reason during the Equipment of these Ships, to think I might be Employd upon this Service in some way or other , and as Capt. Phillips was appointed Governor of the New Settlement, and of Cruise had much Business to Transact in Town, I frequently visited the Ship & sometimes receivd his direction in any thing that might relate to the fitting her, She was out of the Dock & the rigging in hand, when I first went on board. On the 9th Decm. the Ship being ready to fall down the River, We slipt the Moorings & saild down to Longreach, where we took in Guns & Gunners stores. On the 15th I receivd

received by letter from Mr. Stephens Secretary to the Admty. information , that there was a Commission Signd for me in that office, & desiring that I would come to Town to take it up. The Nature of the Service upon which the Sirius might be Employ’d in those seas to which she was bound, having been Consider’d, it was Judg’d necessary that an officer bearing a Certain Rank shou’d Command that Ship in the Absence of C: Phillip whose presence it was to be supposd woud be requisite at all times wherever the Seat of Government in that Country might be fix’d. In Consequence of Mr. Stephens letter I repaird to the Admiralty & receivd a Commission appointing me Second Captain of His Majs. Ship the Sirius with the rank of Post Captain, and with the Power to Command her Principal Captain, Subject nevertheless to his Control & to such orders & directions for any proceedings, as he might see occasion to give me for the Good of the Service. This appointment of a Second Capt. to a private Ship, being the first Instance in our Service, It cou’d not, Consistant with the Establish’d regulations of the Navy, take place, but by the interference of the Kings Order in Council, an Order from His Majesty in Council authorizing the Lords of the Admiralty to make such appointment was therefore given - On the 30th. of Janry. 1787. two Transports, one having Male the other Female Convicts on board, dropt down to Longreach But—

Collection 05: John Hunter - journal kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1518004
Transcript: 

(4-5)
But they having Business to transact with the Owners of the Ships relative to their Ships Companys, were permitted to proceed as low as Gravesend, where the Sirius joind them the next day and proceeded immediatly to the Nore where we Anchor’d the same day, & on the 4th. of February we arrivd in the Downes; before we left the Nore the Supply Arm’d Tender joind us - We were detaind by bad Wr. and strong Westerly winds in the Downes untill the 19th. when we put to Sea in Company with the Supply & Transports, and arrivd on the Motherbank the 21st: At this Anchorage the whole of the Transports, & Store Ships were directed to Rendezvous, the latter were already arriv’d, & whilst we lay there the other Transports from the Westward join’d us - On the 9th. of May, Capt. Phillip arriv’d in Portsmouth & the next day came on board & issued the Signals & other Necessary Orders to Lieut. J. Shortland the Agent for the Transports.—

On Sunday the 13th: We saild from the Motherbank in Company with the Supply Arm’d Tender and Six Transports having on board 600 Male & 200 Female Convicts, and those Store Ships carrying provisions & various other Stores; on board the Ships carrying Convicts, were Embark’d 160 Marines with their proper Officers. Major Robert Ross was the Commandant of the Batallion & appointed Lieut. Governor of the New Settlement: a Surgeon and three assistants were also Embark’d in the Transports with Medicine & Necessary for the Voyage - The Wind being Easterly we ran out at the Needles, & were accompanied by His Majs. Ship Hyaena Capt. DeCourcy having receiv’d orders from the Admiralty to see us 100 Leagues to the Westward. We had light Breezes with fair & pleasant Weather down Channel, but had the Mortification to find that two of our Transports saild exceedingly heavy, one of which the Hyaena tow’d for two or three days - On the 15th. at Sunsett the start point bore NE½E by Compas distant 7 or 8 Leags. & at Noon on this day which finishes the Nautical & begins the Astronomical day, the Longde. by Aus. was 5°0’1 Wt. of the Meridn. of Greenwich, & by a Time Piece made by Mr. Kendal with which the Board of Longitude had

Collection 05: John Hunter - journal kept on board the Sirius during a voyage to New South Wales, May 1787 - March 1791 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1518005

 Jacob Nagle (1761 - 1841)

The account of seaman Jacob Nagle was written some 40 years after the events it describes and provides the perspective of the common sailor. Jacob Nagle was born in the American colony of Pennsylvania in 1761. He fought in the American War of Independence and served time as a prisoner of war of the British as a result. Following the American Revolutionary War in 1783, Nagle joined the Royal Navy and was transferred to the Sirius, as Able Seaman, in March 1787. He sailed with the First Fleet on the Sirius.

At Botany Bay, in January 1788, he was part of Phillip’s boating party exploring the coast and harbour, looking for a better site to found the colony.

The Sirius, with Nagle aboard, was sent to Norfolk Island in March 1790 where the ship was lost on a reef, stranding her crew until they were taken back to Sydney Cove in February 1791.

Nagle returned to England and was paid off at Portsmouth in 1792. He died in Ohio, United States of America, in 1841. Nagle's journal was acquired by the Library in 1995.

About this item: 

Jacob Nagle (1761-1841) was born in the American colony of Pennsylvania and fought in the American Revolution (War of Independence) in 1777 and 1778. From 1780, as a seaman, he went out on speculative cruises aboard various privateers along the east coast, before being captured by the Royal Navy in November 1781. At the end of the war in 1783 he was discharged at Plymouth, England. A few months later Nagle joined the Royal Navy and served on HMS Ganges for three and a half years spent largely in Portsmouth harbour. He transferred to HMS Sirius in March 1787 and sailed on her with the First Fleet to Sydney Cove. The Sirius, with Nagle aboard, was sent to Norfolk Island in March 1790 where the ship was lost on a reef, stranding her crew until the Supply, with a rented Dutch ship, the Waaksamheyd took them back to Sydney Cove in February 1791, and thence to England. Nagle's memoir records his travels as a seaman and quartermaster in the Royal Navy.
Jacob Nagle died in Ohio, United States of America, in 1841.

Transcript: 

As I am fully Convinced that I cannot give a full Account of my Travels by Recollection I shall endeavour to Relate what I Can Recollect to the best of my Knolidge.
My Father was of the german decent and my Mother of the Quakers from England my grandmother having Two husbands Our families have spring from the Nagles, Lincolns &Rogers, a short time after my father being high Sherriff of Berks County the War broke out in Boston with the Brittish in 1775 &My Father Receidd a Capn Commission & Raised a Rifle Company & Marched in the Month of June for Boston in the year 1775. During the time that he Remained there he Receivd a Light Wound by a shell from the Enemy a Cross the bridge of his nose in a Short time after he joined the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment in the capassity as Major then Prefored to Leutn Colonel & full Colonel of the Ninth & 10th Pennsylvania Lines, in 1777 Lord how landed at the head of Elk* Marching for Philadelphia my father sent for me I was then not sixteen I joined the Army Marching through Wilmington that Night &my father took me to Coln Procter who Commanded the grand park of Artilery I laid in his Markee that Night & the next day I was put under the

Collection 08: Jacob Nagle - memoir. Titled `Jacob Nagle his Book A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Nine May 19th. Canton. Stark County Ohio', 1775-1802, compiled 1829
1775-1802, compiled 1829
Nagle, Jacob, 1761-1841
Digital ID: 
a366001
View collection item detail
Transcript: 

The Brittish Artillery Advanced in the plowed field it being upon a decent down to the Brandewine. The Canonading begun on both & Continued a heavy fire till about Eight or nine as near as I can Recollect, but we Could Purceive the Brittish Artilery would leave there guns Two or three Yards when he saw the flash of our guns then proceed when the shot struck We then Ceased firing for about an hour the Artilery ware ordered sum Liquor & he mixed it with water & Powder.
The Adjutant desired to Rest a little & told me to come under a waggon that had shells for a 13 1/2 [?] commanded by Capn Courtney Paterson which was split about 10 oClock & Sent away Unserviseable Hofner & Myself was laying under the waggon when the Enemy Sent a Shot & Caried a way One of the wheels I hollowed out to hofner, hofner the waggon will be on you & I jumped from under he Replied lay still You Young Pashel, the waggon Remained firm, but I shifted my Quarters, the time now Expired & the Action Began in general upon all Quarters. About 10 or 11 o'clock Genl Washington Came riding up to Coln Procter with his life Guards with him & Enquired how he came on

Collection 08: Jacob Nagle - memoir. Titled `Jacob Nagle his Book A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Nine May 19th. Canton. Stark County Ohio', 1775-1802, compiled 1829 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a366003
Transcript: 

As I am fully Convinced that I cannot give a full Account of my Travels by Recollection I shall endeavour to Relate what I Can Recollect to the best of my Knolidge.
My Father was of the german decent and my Mother of the Quakers from England my grandmother having Two husbands Our families have spring from the Nagles, Lincolns &Rogers, a short time after my father being high Sherriff of Berks County the War broke out in Boston with the Brittish in 1775 &My Father Receidd a Capn Commission & Raised a Rifle Company & Marched in the Month of June for Boston in the year 1775. During the time that he Remained there he Receivd a Light Wound by a shell from the Enemy a Cross the bridge of his nose in a Short time after he joined the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment in the capassity as Major then Prefored to Leutn Colonel & full Colonel of the Ninth & 10th Pennsylvania Lines, in 1777 Lord how landed at the head of Elk* Marching for Philadelphia my father sent for me I was then not sixteen I joined the Army Marching through Wilmington that Night &my father took me to Coln Procter who Commanded the grand park of Artilery I laid in his Markee that Night & the next day I was put under the

Collection 08: Jacob Nagle - memoir. Titled `Jacob Nagle his Book A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Nine May 19th. Canton. Stark County Ohio', 1775-1802, compiled 1829 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a366005
About this item: 

Jacob Nagle (1761-1841) was born in the American colony of Pennsylvania and fought in the American Revolution (War of Independence) in 1777 and 1778. From 1780, as a seaman, he went out on speculative cruises aboard various privateers along the east coast, before being captured by the Royal Navy in November 1781. At the end of the war in 1783 he was discharged at Plymouth, England. A few months later Nagle joined the Royal Navy and served on HMS Ganges for three and a half years spent largely in Portsmouth harbour. He transferred to HMS Sirius in March 1787 and sailed on her with the First Fleet to Sydney Cove. The Sirius, with Nagle aboard, was sent to Norfolk Island in March 1790 where the ship was lost on a reef, stranding her crew until the Supply, with a rented Dutch ship, the Waaksamheyd took them back to Sydney Cove in February 1791, and thence to England. Nagle's memoir records his travels as a seaman and quartermaster in the Royal Navy.
Jacob Nagle died in Ohio, United States of America, in 1841.

Transcript: 

he Informed the General that there was Five Field pieses behind the Wood on Our left which I before mentioned that anoied us Very much &he was then Ordering 4 Pieces to play upon them Accordingly he aimed for the flash of the Guns as he Could not see the gun however in 15 or 20 minutes we Received no more shot from that Quarter we Supposed the ware dismounted[?] The Adjutant Rode down to the ford to water his hors & a hession Laying in the Brush fired at him & missed him & wounded the horse in the Right shouldier by this time the hessions got into the wood & Morgans Rifelmen I Could See Some of the Riflemen in the Buckwheatfield One in a white frock Lay on his back to load his gun on the Edge of the Wood next to the road there was Sum trees fell & the hessions got into there trees & this Riflemen fired 7 or 8 times at them in these trees the Buckwheat being in Bloom the Could not see him, but we were on the right over Him at length he Cralled on his hands & nees to the fence where he fell in with Six More the Then all got up & Marched into the woods where he had been firing at them as we supposed to Overhall them.
My father's Regment was on Our Right belonging to Genl Conneways Brigade the Action Continued Very heavy during the day the British Advanced to the Very Works

Collection 08: Jacob Nagle - memoir. Titled `Jacob Nagle his Book A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Nine May 19th. Canton. Stark County Ohio', 1775-1802, compiled 1829
1775-1802, compiled 1829
Nagle, Jacob, 1761-1841
Digital ID: 
a366004
View collection item detail
About this item: 

Jacob Nagle (1761-1841) was born in the American colony of Pennsylvania and fought in the American Revolution (War of Independence) in 1777 and 1778. From 1780, as a seaman, he went out on speculative cruises aboard various privateers along the east coast, before being captured by the Royal Navy in November 1781. At the end of the war in 1783 he was discharged at Plymouth, England. A few months later Nagle joined the Royal Navy and served on HMS Ganges for three and a half years spent largely in Portsmouth harbour. He transferred to HMS Sirius in March 1787 and sailed on her with the First Fleet to Sydney Cove. The Sirius, with Nagle aboard, was sent to Norfolk Island in March 1790 where the ship was lost on a reef, stranding her crew until the Supply, with a rented Dutch ship, the Waaksamheyd took them back to Sydney Cove in February 1791, and thence to England. Nagle's memoir records his travels as a seaman and quartermaster in the Royal Navy.
Jacob Nagle died in Ohio, United States of America, in 1841.

Transcript: 

Care of Adjutant Hofner & Messed with him in a few days we encamped on the brandewine on the hight & to the Right of Shadsford, to the left of us a Cross the Road there was a Buck wheatfield opposite to a wood & the brandewine between, them the provision Waggons being Sent Away we ware Three days without provisions Excepting what was bought from the farmers that Came into Camp & Sold us besides what the Soldiers plundered from the farmers, & Receiv'd a [Neats] [?] Tongue from my father & hofner bought sum potatoes & butter the Evening before the Brittish Arived & we Concluded to have it for breekfast Hofner gave it to One of the Soldiers Wives that Remained with the Army to Cook for us She had the Camp kettle on with the whole of it, but Unfortunately while Cannonading the Enemies shot took the Kettle & all its contents away with it therefore we made another fast day. the Evening before the Infintry hove up abrest Work for the Artilery the Infintry laid in Our rear & Our Amunition Wagons Next to the Artilery We wer in front of an orchard and a brest of a plow'd field which the Brittish wis in with their artillery the Brandewine between the Enemy & us at Day Break the Brittish Apeared & hoisted a Read Flag on the top of the farm house Opposite to us

Collection 08: Jacob Nagle - memoir. Titled `Jacob Nagle his Book A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Nine May 19th. Canton. Stark County Ohio', 1775-1802, compiled 1829
1775-1802, compiled 1829
Nagle, Jacob, 1761-1841
Digital ID: 
a366002
View collection item detail

 James Scott (? - 1796)

Little is known of James Scott, Sergeant of Marines. He travelled on the Prince of Wales transport and was accompanied by his wife, Jane, and their daughter Elizabeth, born during the voyage. A son, William, was born in the colony. The family arrived back in England in June 1792. While in New South Wales Scott spent all his time in Port Jackson.

Scott's journal was bequeathed by Sir William Dixson in 1952.

Transcript: 

I Ordd My Rum to be Stopd
Saturday May the 19th 1787 at 3 Gills - day
Serjt Hume's Wifes Stoptd Sunday 20th May
& his Stoptd Sunday 27th May 87
by his Owne Order—
54Co Mich Redmans Wifes Grog Was Ordtd
to be Stopt by L.ieut Maxwell

Monday,Tuesday — May 21st 1787 —
Which Was Complyd With the 22d May, 87.
ordd to have her Grog 23rd June 1787
It was After the Centinals Was Relevd for Eight OClock
That M' Maxwell Ordrd Mich Redman a
Centinal to take his great Coat off
Which Redman Repld he Was Sentry

[Page torn]

Board the Princ of Wales .. .
.. Flee ... ay & proceedd ... Sea through ... els.—
Wind Modrate But ... are

Monday 14th
The Hyena Frigate Towed the Charllotte
Transport into the Fleet. As She Was
A Great Way a Stern
All the Fleet in Sight With, little
Wind. But fare Down Channel

Tuesday 15th
Seen the Ediston Light House Distance 3 Leaugs

Wednessday 16th
at P,M, it began to blow fresh as Wee Cleard
the Channel. & Contineud till Next Morning;

Thursday 17th
Moderate Weather; Wind foul;—
My Wife Was Sea Sick from the 14th to the 17th at. AM;
A Great Number of the Woman,
on Board being Sea Sick —

Friday 18th
At P.M. it began to blow fresh from the Southward

Saturday 19th
Wind Contineud fresh, With Rain; ye Fleet. All in sight.—

Sunday 20th
Fare Weather With a fresh Brees At. West
Same day at P.M. the Hyena Friget parted
the fleet & Returnd to England, & Our Capt
Was Ordrd to Send One Mrs Holt, a Midshipman
Wife Belonging to the Sirus On Board the
Hyena for a pasage to England —
The Commadore Ordd 2 Male Convicts from the
Scarbr,o Transpt on Bd the Prince of Wales
As the was, the Ring leaders of a bought Number
that intended to Rise & take the Ship —

Monday 21st
Fare Weather

Collection 09: James Scott - Journal titled `Remarks on a passage Botnay [i.e. Botany] bay 1787', 13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1142001
Transcript: 

1787
May
[page torn]

... to B ...
... d from the (Mo ... in

Sirius Commadore Phillips
Supply Tender Lieut Ball

Charlotte Transport, With Male & Fem Conv. ts
Scarborough Do. With. Male Do.
Frendship.— Do. With Male & Fem1 Do.
Prince of Wales Do. with 2 Male & 50 Feme 2 Childn
Alexander Do. With Male Do.
Lady Penarin Do. With Female Do.
Fishburn Agent } Victrs
Goulden Grove } With Stores ImpleMrs
Borrowdale } provision &c &c

Tuesday 22d
Nothing Extrordry — All the fleet. in Sight

Wednsd 23d Do. Do.

Thursdy 24th Do. Do.

Friday 25th Fresh breeses But. fare Do.

Saturday 26 Fare Wind Do.

Sunday 27 Do. Do.

Monday 28th Do.being in Latud 36°8’ N Do.

Tuesday 29th
the having No Observation on Bd Ps of Wales
The Commadore Ordrd the Supply to Go. a
Head to Luck out for Land, As Wee Ware
About, the Latud of Medara — Wind Fare

Wednessy 30th
Seen the Island of Madera at. 6 A.M

Thursday 31st
Seen the Island of Gomera Bearing
S.W. 7 or 8 Leauges, Dis,— little Wind
Gomera, Is leys in
North Latd 28°5' Lon. 17°8' SuBd to Spain —

Collection 09: James Scott - Journal titled `Remarks on a passage Botnay [i.e. Botany] bay 1787', 13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1142002
Transcript: 

1787
At Sea

Friday June lst
At. 9 OClock AM. Owr Dms Wife
Was Delevered of a Male Child —
Little or No Wind —

Saturday 2d
Being in Latd by O 29°46' North, had
Little or No Wind

Sunday 3rd
Seen the land of Tenareef Erley in the
Morning;— Came to An Anker at. 7 OClock in the
Road Sted of Santa Cruse in the
Eving & like Wise All the fleet,
After a pasage of three Weeks
from England,— At Tenareef —

Monday 4th
The Long Boat Was Got Out. Nothg
Extrordry;— peack Bearing W.BS. (Ankrod in) A 12,
Fathom =Water
Tuesday 5th
I And My Wife Went on Shore
At Santa Cruse, With leave from
the Governer Phillip —
Wednessdy 6th Nothg Ex,
Thursday 7th
The Spanards had a Rejoising Day
& Fired Several Guns On the Occasion

Friday 8th Notg Ex.

Saturday 9th
A Court Martial Was Held On Bd
the Ch Alexander;
On Richd Askew A Marine,— Conserg
Liquor. Aquited —

The Fleet having Compld thier Watring
&c the Commadore Made a Signel,
A Blue Flag With a Yellow Cross, At. the Main Topgal,t.
Mast head, With a Gun. for No Boats to
Go On Shore On Ane Account

— A Convict that Made his Escape
from the Alexr Transpt At. this
port. Was taken by a Corp1 & Six prts

Collection 09: James Scott - Journal titled `Remarks on a passage Botnay [i.e. Botany] bay 1787', 13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1142003
About this item: 

James Scott, Sergeant of Marines, travelled to New South Wales on board the Prince of Wales. He was accompanied by his wife Jane who gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth, during the voyage. A son, William Boxell, was born in Sydney. He was baptised on 1 July 1790.
Scott and his family left New South Wales on the Portsmouth, and arrived in England in June 1792. 

Reference:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB

Transcript: 

June, 1787
Prince of Wales At. Tenareef
Saturday 9th
Got. Our Long Boat in. & Everey thing in
Rediness for Sea —
I Wrought, to My Frend Mooney
& to My Mother in law, in England
By A Brig Bound for London
Sunday 10th The fleet, proseeded to Sea
At. 5 OClock in the Morng.
Prince of Wales at Sea With the Fleet.—
Little or No Wind Remains Rema. Between the
Islands of Tenareef & Grand, Cannarey
Which is About. 15 Leagues a part.

Monday 11th Between the 2 Islands

Tuesday 12th Fare Wind

Wednesy 13 Nothing Ex

Thursday 14 Do. Do.

Friday 15 Crossd the Tropick of Canser About 2 OClock
in the Afternoon the Fleet All in Sight
& the Usual Seremoney Was performd,
With those that had Not Crossd the
Line before,— Which Was Ducking
Lathering With tar Grase &c and Shavd

N.B. the Seamen performd this Seremony
But the Marines Would Not. be
Allowd to Do it & ordr Mr Maxwell
Our 1st Lieut of Marines —

Saturday 16 A Strong N.E. Trade Wind

Sunday 17 Nothg Ex

Munday 18 At. 8 OClock AM the Supply Brig

Collection 09: James Scott - Journal titled `Remarks on a passage Botnay [i.e. Botany] bay 1787', 13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792
13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792
Scott, James, d. 1796
Digital ID: 
a1142004
View collection item detail
About this item: 

James Scott, Sergeant of Marines, travelled to New South Wales on board the Prince of Wales. He was accompanied by his wife Jane who gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth, during the voyage. A son, William Boxell, was born in Sydney. He was baptised on 1 July 1790.
Scott and his family left New South Wales on the Portsmouth, and arrived in England in June 1792. 

Reference:
Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB

Transcript: 

1787 Prince of Wales at Sea

June, Munday 18th
Made the Signal for Land.—
The Commadore Made the Signal
for the fleet to prepare to Ankor
At. P.M Seen the Island of May,o

Tuesday 19th Past, the Is of Mayo one of the
Cape De Verd Islands —
A.M Seen the Is of St Jago
Came Close to the Bay of Prince
Supert, But. the Commadore Would
Not Go in, As Wee All Expected that he Would,—
At. P.M. Stood A Way to
the Southward All the fleet in Sight.—

Wednesy 20th
In Latd B.O. 13° 17; N. Wind E.B.N
the Fleet Steering South.—

Thursday 21st Notg Ex.

Friday 22nd Do.

Satarday 23rd
Little Wind With Rain

Sunday 24th
Mr Maxwell & I Went on Board
the Sirrus; With Arthr Dougherty
& Robt Ryan; Whome Lt Maxwell
Compld of, for being Insolent &
Disobedience of Orders; the two Marins
Was left on Board the Sirus as
prisoners that Night,—

Monday 25th
Major Ross With proper Officers
Came on Board the Prince of Wales
With the prisoners, for a Court Martial,— Turn

Collection 09: James Scott - Journal titled `Remarks on a passage Botnay [i.e. Botany] bay 1787', 13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792
13 May 1787 - 20 May 1792
Scott, James, d. 1796
Digital ID: 
a1142005
View collection item detail

 George Bouchier Worgan (1757 - 1838)

George Worgan was probably born in 1757. He was appointed as surgeon on the Sirius in November 1786. His journal extract covers the brief period from 20 January - 11 July 1788 only and is attached to a long, descriptive letter to his brother, Richard, in England. Worgan makes references to a fuller journal which he is keeping and also to his 'rough' journal from which these entries have been copied out but these have not been located.

Worgan, who seems to have been an amiable, good natured man, describes his life in the colony enthusiastically, even boyishly to his brother. He undertook several expeditions to the Hawkesbury and Broken Bay areas.

He returned to England in 1791 in the Waaksamheid. He died in March 1838, his death certificate says by apoplexy.

The acquisition of the journal of Surgeon George Worgan is the most curious of all. Found among the personal belongings of a deceased aunt, the journal was donated to the Library by her family in 1955.

About this item: 

George Bouchier Worgan was probably born in 1757. He joined the Navy in 1775 and was appointed Surgeon on HMS Sirius in November 1786. Musically inclined, he brought his piano with him to the colony. Along with the crew of the Sirius, he left Australia to return to England in March 1791, arriving in April 1792. He had left his piano with Elizabeth Macarthur. 
His journal is an account of the first five months of settlement in New South Wales, attached to a letter written to his brother Richard Worgan. 
He married Mary Lawry, probably after his return from Australia, and they had two sons and a daughter. Both sons eventually migrated to Australia. Worgan died in March 1838, his death certificate says by apoplexy but there are other accounts which suggest suicide. (see Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Collection 10: George Bouchier Worgan - letter written to his brother Richard Worgan, 12 - 18 June 1788. Includes journal fragment kept by George on a voyage to New South Wales with the First Fleet on board HMS Sirius, 20 January 1788 - 11 July 1788
20 January - 11 July 1788
Worgan, George Bouchier, 1757-1838
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1175001
About this item: 

George Bouchier Worgan was probably born in 1757. He joined the Navy in 1775 and was appointed Surgeon on HMS Sirius in November 1786. Musically inclined, he brought his piano with him to the colony. Along with the crew of the Sirius, he left Australia to return to England in March 1791, arriving in April 1792. He had left his piano with Elizabeth Macarthur. 
His journal is an account of the first five months of settlement in New South Wales, attached to a letter written to his brother Richard Worgan. 
He married Mary Lawry, probably after his return from Australia, and they had two sons and a daughter. Both sons eventually migrated to Australia. Worgan died in March 1838, his death certificate says by apoplexy but there are other accounts which suggest suicide. (see Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Collection 10: George Bouchier Worgan - letter written to his brother Richard Worgan, 12 - 18 June 1788. Includes journal fragment kept by George on a voyage to New South Wales with the First Fleet on board HMS Sirius, 20 January 1788 - 11 July 1788
20 January - 11 July 1788
Worgan, George Bouchier, 1757-1838
View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1175002
Transcript: 

Sirius, Sydney Cove, Port Jackson - June 12M 1788. De/ur Richard.
I think I hear You saying, "Where the D—ce is Sydney Cove Port Jackson"? and see You whirling the Letter about to find out the the Name of the Scribe: Perhaps You have taken up Salmons Gazetteer, if so, pray spare your Labour, and attend to Me for half an Hour
- We sailed from the Cape of Good Hope on the 12th of November 1787- As that was the last civilized Country We should touch at, in our Passage to Botany Bay We provided ourselves with every Article, necessary for the forming a civilized Colony, Live Stock, consisting of Bulls, Cows, Horses Mares, Colts, Sheep, Hogs, Goats Fowls and other living Creatures by Pairs. We likewise, procured a vast Number of Plants, Seeds & other Garden articles, such, as Orange, Lime, Lemon, Quince Apple, Pear Trees, in a Word, every Vegetable Production that the Cape afforded. Thus Equipped, each Ship like another Noah's Ark, away we steered for Botany Bay, and after a tolerably pleasant Voyage of 10 Weeks & 2 Days Governour Phillip, had the Satisfaction to see the whole of his little Fleet safe at Anchor in the said Bay.
As we were sailing in We saw 8 or 10 of the Natives, sitting on the Rocks on the South Shore, and as the Ships bordered pretty near thereto, we could hear them hollow, and observe them talking to one another very earnestly, at the same time pointing towards the Ships; they were of a black reddish sooty Colour, entirely naked, walked very upright, and each of them had long Spears and a short Stick in their hands, soon after the Ships had anchored, the Indians went up into the Wood, lit a Fire, and sat Around about it, as unconcerned (apparently,) as tho' nothing had occurred to them. Two Boats from the Sirius.were now Manned and armed, and the Governor, accompanied by Capt Hunter, and several other Officers, went towards the Shore, where they had seen the Natives, who perceiving the Boats making towards the Beach, came out of the Wood, and walked along, some distance from the Water-side, but immediately on the Boats landing, they scampered up into the Woods again, with great Precipitation.
On this, the Governor, advised, that we should seem quite indifferent about them, and this apparent Indifference had a good Effect, for they very soon appeared in sight of Us, When, the Governor held up some Beads, Red Cloth & other Bawbles and made signs for them to advance, but they still were exceedingly shy & timid, and would not be enticed by our allurements; which the Governor perceiving, He shewed them his Musket, then laid it on the Ground, advancing singly towards them, they now seeing that He had nothing in his Hands like a Weapon one of y oldest of the Natives gave his Spears to a younger, and approached to meet the Governor, but not without discovering manifest tokens of Fear, and distrust, making signs for the things to be laid on the Ground which, the Governor complying with, He advanced, tooke them up, and went back to his Companions; Another, came forth and wanted some of the same kind of Presents, which, were given to Him by the same Method, at length, after various Methods to impress them

Collection 10: George Bouchier Worgan - letter written to his brother Richard Worgan, 12 - 18 June 1788. Includes journal fragment kept by George on a voyage to New South Wales with the First Fleet on board HMS Sirius, 20 January 1788 - 11 July 1788 View collection item detail
Digital ID: 
a1175003
About this item: 

George Bouchier Worgan was probably born in 1757. He joined the Navy in 1775 and was appointed Surgeon on HMS Sirius in November 1786. Musically inclined, he brought his piano with him to the colony. Along with the crew of the Sirius, he left Australia to return to England in March 1791, arriving in April 1792. He had left his piano with Elizabeth Macarthur. 
His journal is an account of the first five months of settlement in New South Wales, attached to a letter written to his brother Richard Worgan. 
He married Mary Lawry, probably after his return from Australia, and they had two sons and a daughter. Both sons eventually migrated to Australia. Worgan died in March 1838, his death certificate says by apoplexy but there are other accounts which suggest suicide. (see Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

with the Belief that We meant them no harm, they suffered Us to come up to them, and after making them all presents, which they received with much the same kind of Pleasure, which Children shew at such Bawbles, just looking at them, then holding out their Hands for more, some laughing heartily, and jumping extravagantly; they began to shew a Confidence, and became very familiar, and curious about ourCloaths, feeling the Coat, Waistcoat, and even the Shirt and on seeing one of the Gentlemen, pull off his Hat, they all set up a loud Hoop, one was curious enough to take hold of a Gentlemans Hair that was cued, and called to his Companions to look at it, this was the occasion of another loud Hoop, accompanied with other Emotions of Astonishment. In a Word, they seemed pretty well divested of their Fears, and became very funny Fellows.
They suffered the Sailors to dress them with different coloured Papers, and Fools-Caps, which pleased them mightily, the strange contrast these Decorations made with their black Complexion brought strongly to my Mind, the Chimney-Sweepers in London on a May-Day. - They were all Men & Boys in this Tribe.
I should have told You, that the Governor, left the Sirius soon after we sailed from the Cape of Good Hope; and Embarked on Board the Supply Brig & Gave up the Command of ye Convoy to Cap.tn Hunter, in order that he might proceed on before the main Body of the Fleet, but he arrived in Botany Bay, only two Days before Us. In this Time, He had obtained an Intercourse or two, with some Natives on the North Shore, but, as the Means which he took to gain their Confidence, and effect a Parley, were much the same as those, I have given you an account of, I shall only mention a few singular Circumstances that occurred in these Intercourses.
The Supply Brig, arrived in ye Bay about 2 ºClk in the Afternoon,of ye 18th January and at 4 O´Clock, The Governor, attended by several Officers, went in two armed Boats towards a part of the Shore where, 6 of the Natives, were, and had been sitting the whole time the Supply was entering the Bay, looking and pointing at Her with great Earnestness; When the Boats had approached pretty near this Spot, two of the Natives got up, and came close to the Waters-Edge, making Motions, pointing to another part of the Shore and talking very fast & loud, seemingly, as if the Part to which they pointed, was better landing for the Boats, they could not however, discern any thing unfriendly, or threatening in the Signs and Motions which the Natives made.
- Accordingly the Boats coasted along the Shore in a Direction for the Place, to which, they had been directed, the Natives following on the Beach. In the mean Time, the Governor, or somebody in his Boat, made Signs that they wanted Water, this they signified by putting a Hat over the Side of the Boat and seeming to take up some of the salt Water put it to his Mouth, the Natives, immediately, understood this Sign

Collection 10: George Bouchier Worgan - letter written to his brother Richard Worgan, 12 - 18 June 1788. Includes journal fragment kept by George on a voyage to New South Wales with the First Fleet on board HMS Sirius, 20 January 1788 - 11 July 1788
20 January - 11 July 1788
Worgan, George Bouchier, 1757-1838
Digital ID: 
a1175004
View collection item detail
About this item: 

George Bouchier Worgan was probably born in 1757. He joined the Navy in 1775 and was appointed Surgeon on HMS Sirius in November 1786. Musically inclined, he brought his piano with him to the colony. Along with the crew of the Sirius, he left Australia to return to England in March 1791, arriving in April 1792. He had left his piano with Elizabeth Macarthur. 
His journal is an account of the first five months of settlement in New South Wales, attached to a letter written to his brother Richard Worgan. 
He married Mary Lawry, probably after his return from Australia, and they had two sons and a daughter. Both sons eventually migrated to Australia. Worgan died in March 1838, his death certificate says by apoplexy but there are other accounts which suggest suicide. (see Mollie Gillen, The founders of Australia; ADB)

Transcript: 

and with great Willingness to Oblige, pointed to the Westward, and walked that Way, apparently with an Intention to show their Visitors the very Spot. The Boats steered towards the Place, and soon discovered the Run of fresh Water, opposite to which, they landed, and tasting it found it to be very good. The Natives had stopped about 30 Yards from ye Place where the Boat landed, to whom, the Gentlemen made signs of thanks for their friendly Information, at the same time offering Presents, and doing every thing they could think of, to make them lay aside their Fears and advance towards them, but this point was gained only, by the Methods that I have mentioned: and when they did venture to come and take the things out of the Governor's & the other Gentlemen's Hands, it was with evident Signs of Fear, the Gentlemen now having distributed all their Presents among them, returned on Board. Thus, was our first Intercourse obtained, with these Children of Nature.
- About 12 of the Natives appeared the next Morning, on the Shore opposite to the Supply, they had a Dog with them, (something of the Fox Species); The Governor and the same Gentlemen that were of his Party Yesterday went on Shore, and very soon came to a Parley with them, there were some of their Acquaintances among the Number, and these advanced first (leaving their Spears with their Companions who remained behind at a little Distance) as they had done Yesterday); They all of them in a short time became Confident, Familiar & vastly funny took any thing that was offered them, holding out their Hands and making Signs for many things that they saw, laughed when we laughed, jumped extravagantly, and grunted by way of Music, & Repeated many Words & Phrases after Us. The Gentlemen having passed about an hour with them, returned on Board, but could not induce any of the Natives to accompany them there.
A Party of Us made an Excursion up an Arm in the North part of the Bay, where we had not been long landed before we discovered among the Bushes a Tribe of the Natives, who at first did not discover such an inoffensive & friendly Disposition, as those I have spoke of, above; for these rude, unsociable Fellows, immediately threw a Lance, which fell very near one of the Sailors, and stuck several Inches in the Ground, we returned the Compliment by firing a Musket over their Heads, on which I thought they would have broken their Necks with running away from Us. about an hour after, we, in our Ramble, fell in with them again, they stood still, but seemed ready for another Start. One of Us, now laid down the Musket and advanced towards them singly, holding out some Bawbles, and making Signs of Peace; In a little time they began to gain Confidence, and two of them approached to meet the Gentlemen who held out the Presents, the Introduction being amicably settled, they all joined Us, and took the Trinkets we offered them; The same Emotions of Pleasure, Astonishment, Curiosity & Timidity, appeared in these poor Creatures, as had been observed in our first Acquaintances
-There were some Old and young Women in this Tribe, whom the Men seemed very jealous & careful of, keeping them at Distance behind some young Men, who were armed with Spears, Clubs &

Collection 10: George Bouchier Worgan - letter written to his brother Richard Worgan, 12 - 18 June 1788. Includes journal fragment kept by George on a voyage to New South Wales with the First Fleet on board HMS Sirius, 20 January 1788 - 11 July 1788
20 January - 11 July 1788
Worgan, George Bouchier, 1757-1838
Digital ID: 
a1175005
View collection item detail