Newsflash:

Disruption to catalogue & other services from 2 to 3 July 2022. Read the full news item. 

History Now: migration history

History Now: migration history

Join historians Roland Leikauf (Australian National Maritime Museum) and Dr Alexandra Dellios (Australian National University) in conversation with Dr Peter Hobbins (Australian National Maritime Museum).

Wednesday
3 August 2022 5pm to 6pm

Price

General Admission: Free

Location

Map Rooms, First Floor
Mitchell Building
Sydney NSW 2000
Australia

 

Join historians Roland Leikauf (Australian National Maritime Museum) and Dr Alexandra Dellios (Australian National University) in conversation with Dr Peter Hobbins (Australian National Maritime Museum).

Roland Leikauf (Australian National Maritime Museum): It seems easy to identify key objects connected with the waves of migration to Australia — tickets and diaries from the age of sail, pictures and utensils of daily life in a migrant camp like Bonegilla. If enough time passes, curators and historians can identify what deserves to be preserved and what is relevant enough to be shown. But what about the artefacts of immigration to Australia that are created today? How do we recognise, retrieve and preserve them, especially when they seem so banal that losing them is always a serious threat? Roland Leikauf is the Curator for Postwar Immigration at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia. Before migrating to Australia in 2021, he worked at the Hadamar Memorial Museum and the House of History in museums in Germany as a curator and historian. 

Dr Alexandra Dellios (Australian National University): In recent years, more and more of Australia’s ethnic minority communities have taken it upon themselves to organise and form their own museum spaces and collections. The tasks of managing and building their own collections, particularly given the long-term institutional disinterest in the material culture of non-anglophone migration, is a mammoth one. Despite the popular celebration of multicultural success, state-funded libraries, museums and archives are not representative, and much of the heritage of postwar migration has been lost. I wish to explore a few examples of community-initiated efforts, and the important heritage work they do in the present political context. In particular, I will look at how the community practice of collecting and creating, particularly through oral histories with older cohorts of migrants from outside the British Isles, offers better models for future practice in the GLAM sector. Alexandra Dellios is a Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of the Centre for Heritage and Museum Studies at the Australian National University. Her latest book is Heritage Making and Migrant Subjects in the Deindustrialising Region of the Latrobe Valley, Cambridge University Press, April 2022.

Dr Peter Hobbins is Head of Knowledge at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia.

This event is part of the History Now series
3 August: Thinking about how to represent migration in museums
7 September: Publishing history
5 October: Histories and heritage of state institutions
2 November: Old and new archives

History Now is a series of public talks and discussions, bringing new perspectives to all aspects of historical practice. The series is designed to encourage engagement with the writing, making and creating of histories. It is a collaboration between the Australian Centre for Public History, UTS and the State Library of NSW. The convenors for 2022–23 are Paula Hamilton and Paul Ashton.

 


More events that may be of interest to you